Hawaii Resident’s Strutting Chicken Photo Wins USDA Photo Contest

A chance encounter with a feral chicken at sunrise on the island of Oahu prompted a photo that won the Cutest Bird category in the USDA sponsored Cutest Bird Photo Contest for May.

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(PRWEB) June 19, 2013

A chance encounter with a feral chicken at sunrise on the island of Oahu prompted a photo that won the Cutest Bird category in the USDA sponsored Cutest Bird Photo Contest for May.

“I was sitting in my car enjoying the sunrise with a cup of coffee on a mountain lookout near my home,” photographer Carol Russell recalls. “This wild chicken walked by and stopped to stare at me. His expression was priceless – as though I had a nerve to be on his mountain. The sun was just rising behind him, making his feathers glow. I snapped the photo through my windshield.”

Hawaii, she says, has lots of feral chickens who survive on their own. This one seemed to appear out of nowhere, turned to check her out, and then went on his way.

The photo is featured on the Biosecurity For Birds website until the June winners are posted.

A resident of Kaneohe near Honolulu, Russell often drives on weekends to the nearby mountaintop at sunrise or sunset to enjoy the glorious vista. “It is one of the more fabulous perks of living in Hawaii,” she says.

Other perks, she says, are the weather, the delightful people and her job at USDA as a plant protection and quarantine officer. She has worked in Hawaii for 18 years.

The Cutest Bird Photo Contest ends June 30. The winning photos will be posted on the Biosecurity For Birds website and will be considered for inclusion on the 2014 Biosecurity For Birds Calendar. For an entry form, contest rules and more information, visit https://web01.aphis.usda.gov/biobird_contest.nsf/contest_entry?OpenForm.

The Biosecurity For Birds program, begun in 2004, is designed to educate backyard poultry owners and bird enthusiasts about highly contagious poultry diseases and other threats to birds. The program helps inform bird lovers how to prevent disease and tells them what to do if they suspect their birds might be ill.


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  • Pam Goldstein
    Diversity Marketing and Communications
    973-377-0300 14
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