Scambook Offers Identity Theft Damage Control Advice

Identity theft is a constant worry for many consumers, thus Scambook, the Internet’s leading online complaint resolution platform, is educating the public about how to take immediate action in the event that their private personal or financial information is stolen.

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If consumers believe they have been the victim of identity theft, they need to take immediate action to minimize the damage.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) June 20, 2013

Identity theft is a constant worry for many consumers, thus Scambook, the Internet’s leading online complaint resolution platform, is educating the public about how to take immediate action in the event that their private personal or financial information is stolen.

"It's easy to find tips about how to guard against identity theft, but it's equally important for consumers to know what steps to take in a worst-case scenario when prevention isn't enough," said Kase Chong, Scambook's Director of Marketing. "If consumers believe they have been the victim of identity theft, they need to take immediate action to minimize the damage."

Therefore, Scambook is offering three tips for individuals to follow should they ever need to perform identity theft damage control:

1. Place a Fraud Alert on All Credit Reports. Contact one of the three major US credit agencies such as Experian, TransUnion, or Equifax to notify them of a fraud alert. This will disallow any identity thief to open new financial accounts, such as a new line or credit or a loan, in the victim's name. These agencies all alert one another and filing can be done online or over the phone. Make sure to supply any updates in regards to address and phone number in case any financial institution needs contact information to discuss a suspicious transaction.

2. Order a Credit Report. Everyone is eligible for one free credit report every twelve months. Consumers can get a credit report by contacting Experian, TransUnion, or Equifax, as well as going online to http://www.annualcreditreport.com. Scambook advises consumers to avoid other “free” credit report sites as many have hidden fees. Review the credit report carefully and should there be an error that needs to be disputed, call the business and ask to speak to someone in their fraud department. Scambook advises consumers to follow-up the call with certified mail and to receive a receipt for the letter, creating a physical record of communication.

3. Create an Identity Theft Report. This report helps dispute any accounts opened by a thief so fraudulent debts can be removed and the credit report cleaned up. An Identity Theft Report is comprised of an Identity Theft Affidavit – a detailed summary of the incident, which should be sent to the FTC – and a police report. Consumers should gather hard copies of both the affidavit and police report and store them in a safe place. Copies should also be sent to any banks, lenders, and other businesses at risk. All of these steps will work to minimize damage done by the identity thief.

Victims are also advised to report any cases of identity theft to Scambook in order to help others learn how they can prevent having their identities stolen.

ABOUT SCAMBOOK
Scambook is an online complaint resolution platform dedicated to obtaining justice for victims of fraud with unprecedented speed and accuracy. By building communities and providing resources on the latest scams, Scambook arms consumers with the up-to-date information they need to stay on top of emerging schemes. Since its inception, Scambook has resolved over $10 million in reported consumer damages. For more information, visit scambook.com.


Contact

  • Judy Dixon
    PMBC Group
    (310) 777-7546
    Email