Matthew Sarad to Reverse Aging and Cure Cancer

Former Telomolecular CEO, Matthew Sarad, plans a series of experiments to demonstrate the power of nanotechnology based regenerative medicines.

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I failed to disclose that our management was inexperienced engineering an IPO and this may have been misleading to our shareholders. I might also have failed to comply with broker-dealer laws; however, we were blamed, I feel, for a number of other mistakes that we did not make or which were sincerely misunderstandings. We were all working honestly and hard on changing the world.

Fair Oaks, CA (PRWEB) September 11, 2009

Long-time financier and CEO of U.S. biotechnology companies, Mr. Matthew Sarad, has announced plans to attempt to rejuvenate living animals with advanced nanotechnologies developed by his labs. The goal of the project is to demonstrate that a combination of new nanotechnology based therapeutics can be used to "make young again" moderately-aged large animals that are genetically similar to man. The experiment will be considered successful if it doubles the animal's lifespan and decreases its chronological age by greater than 40%. Mr. Sarad is currently seeking the support of university partners, collaborators, and benefactors to help meet the program goals of rejuvenating three adult animals by mid 2011.

Mr. Sarad has been a leader in the nanotechnology field. In the past he employed top scientists from Harvard, Stanford, MIT, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and UC Davis among others. Some of the therapeutic nanotechnologies that he pioneered are being studied in animals at some of the country's largest hospitals and research centers including a nanotechnology based therapeutic for treating post stroke reperfusion injury and anti-cancer therapeutics that show excellent safety profiles and higher remission rates.

While acting as CEO of Telomolecular Mr. Sarad demonstrated that it is possible to rejuvenate tissues by delivering the whole telomerase protein to cells with a nanotechnology based drug delivery system. The delivery of telomerase repairs degraded chromosomal telomeres which affect the function and activity of a litany of age-associated genes that control the age characteristics and replicate lifespan of cells. The shortening of telomeres plays a role in the development of certain age-associated diseases, such as macular degeneration, arteriosclerosis, osteoporosis, and other degenerative diseases that might be reversed by restoring telomere length.

According to Mr. Sarad, "This experiment is incredibly important. I think we now have a mixture of nanotechnology based gene therapy products that can result in what might be called significant 'organismal rejuvenation'. We have seen regeneration of human tissues in the laboratory. How far this technology can ultimately go is hard to say, but I am optimistic that this is the first step in what will be referred to historically as the moment the age-barrier was broken."

This research may also change the way that cancer is treated in the future. For example, Mr. Sarad's company licensed and improved a protein based anti-cancer therapeutic noted in studies by the University of Nebraska Medical Center to be non-toxic and to cause long-term remission in 80% of all cancer, including difficult to treat neuronal cancer. The Corporation was working on increasing the remission rate further by delivering other tumor suppressor proteins. One or more tumor suppressor genes is corrupted, silenced, or deleted in almost all cancer. This therapeutic drug is being studied today at the country's third largest hospital the Cleveland Clinic in the treatment of cancer and restenosis. The hospital is also studying some of the corporation's tissue regeneration technologies.

Mr. Sarad's career in biotechnology has not been without controversy. In 2008 he was sanctioned by the SEC for alleged securities violations made while taking his company public in 2006. The company, Telomolecular Corp., achieved public status but its shares were later deregistered.

"The mistake I made was being young, inexperienced, and excited about the prospects of our technologies," said Mr. Sarad. "I failed to disclose that our management was inexperienced engineering an IPO and this may have been misleading to our shareholders. I might also have failed to comply with broker-dealer laws; however, we were blamed, I feel, for a number of other mistakes that we did not make or which were sincerely misunderstandings. We were all working honestly and hard on changing the world."

Mr. Sarad hopes that through a public awareness campaign, and by introducing life saving pharmaceutical products to the marketplace, that positive press and scientific review will reinvigorate interest in his work which suffered as a result of the securities problems.

"This rejuvenation experiment is meant to act as a powerful proof-of-concept that the regenerative technologies I have been working on are important and that they might serve a role in medicine. I am of the opinion that this experiment can succeed based on preliminary related studies obtained in vitro and in mice, and I am also, obviously, bullish on the future of regenerative medicine as an industry. While this experiment is not-for-profit, large corporations that have a vision for the future are encouraged to reach out to me and assist. Involvement in this project could hold great and unexpected meaning for their shareholders. I hope that wealthy benefactors, after reviewing our protocol with their physicians, will step forward to provide some aid in this extremely important program. I can't imagine that I am the only person on earth who hopes to enjoy a more youthful health experience."

Mr. Sarad and his science team were the first to:

  • Rejuvenate tissues by delivering the whole telomerase protein and DNA nanocircles in a biodegradable nanoparticle carrier
  • License and work with gene carriers capable of replacing damaged mitochondrial DNA
  • License or invent the in vivo delivery of tumor suppressor proteins that are potentially safer and more efficacious in the treatment of cancer
  • License and improve the in vivo delivery of a variety of age-related proteins such as SOD and catalase in the treatment of disease
  • Build a large-scale manufacturing plant and commercial laboratory for studying and producing biodegradable nanoparticles

"The only way I understand how to make people, including regulators, fully appreciate the value of the technologies I have been working on for the past 10 years is to make a public and visible attempt at rejuvenating an animal. This was the central goal of my company when I founded it. I hope in so doing to rehabilitate my reputation, fix my former company, and bring important medical technologies to global pharmaceutical markets. Those who wish to help may visit MatthewSarad.com and read about this not-for-profit project."

The project goal is to produce and administer a variety of nanotechnology based therapeutics in sheep. Sheep are the ideal animal to study because their DNA is similar to human DNA and human telomerase is effective in lengthening their telomeres. In addition to telomere lengthening the sheep will receive other nanotechnology based therapeutics designed to cause rejuvenation. If successful this experiment might inspire even more elaborate and powerful future experiments. It might also attract interest and money into the field which can be used to tackle some extremely serious and crippling degenerative diseases including cancer.

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