The Alzheimer’s Caregiver Now Recommends Animal Therapy for Alzheimer’s Patients

With over a decade of experience in advising at-home caretakers, The Alzheimer’s Caregiver says the latest information concerning animal-assisted therapy offers special benefits for Alzheimer’s patients.

(PRWEB) March 30, 2013

Over the years, countless health organizations have used pet therapy for patients suffering from various mental diseases. But Tom Elin, CEO of The Alzheimer’s Caregiver, says this kind of therapy is especially beneficial to Alzheimer’s patients suffering from dementia.

In animal-assisted therapy, often called pet therapy, specially-trained dogs and other animals are used to interact with people in need of stimulation and socialization.

Elin says Alzheimer’s patients who have dementia benefit from the presence of therapy animals in eldercare settings. He says a major advantage is reducing agitation, which is common among dementia patients.

According to the Alzheimer’s Caregiver, many of the benefits are also physical. Elin says patients who receive pet visitations increase their physical activity through playing, grooming, and walking the animals. He says some dementia patients eat more following a dog’s visit.

In addition, Elin says animal therapy can help Alzheimer’s patients deal with their feelings of loneliness and isolation, as well as relieve depression and disorientation. He believes that interacting with pets provides an opportunity for positive nonverbal communication.

Memory impaired patients may withdraw from people, but find animal interaction easier, less painful and non-threatening. Other patients simply enjoy the presence of the dog and find pet interaction to be soothing. They benefit from the physical contact provided by contact with a pet.

Find more information about caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease at http://www.thealzheimerscaregiver.com.    

About The Alzheimer’s Caregiver.com:
The Alzheimer’s Caregiver translates academic, scientific, and clinical research about Alzheimer’s disease for professional and at-home caregivers. It offers education, training and materials which often allow users to keep patients at home longer than would be possible otherwise. To find out what The Alzheimer’s Caregiver can do for you or a loved one, visit http://www.TheAlzheimersCaregiver.com.


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