Asking Questions, Finding Solutions: James Schramko's Latest Business Update Explores the Merits of the Questions Technique

Asking the right questions and observing clarity can help a business grow, according to Internet marketing expert and SuperFastBusiness owner James Schramko.

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James Schramko - Online Business Expert

Asking questions after a particularly relevant business experience or occurrence forces one to value clarity. It forces innovation, and hopefully, it’s a self-diagnostic questioning technique that’s going to grow your business.

Sydney, NSW (PRWEB) May 09, 2013

"When things come along, firstly, I don’t call them problems — I refer to them as challenges. And the second thing is, I turn them into a question." This is the "questioning technique" developed by online business expert James Schramko which was recently the topic of a business update video he created for the online marketing community. The technique focuses on an effective way of gleaning lessons from the many bumps on the road that business owners are sure to meet along the path to success. It also motivates entrepreneurs to scrutinize their processes better and ensure that they are getting only the best, most positive outcomes out of every experience.

The idea for the "Questions Technique" came from a rather unexpected turn of events during a scheduled breakfast meeting. Upon arriving at the appointed meeting place, Schramko discovered that the other person had already had breakfast prior to the meeting. The person also immediately proceeded to talk about his business for close to an hour without offering breakfast or even refreshments. At the end of the meeting, Schramko shook hands with the person, but having been caught off guard and growing understandably hungry, he did not enjoy the meeting at all.

"So the question I ask from this challenge is, 'How do I avoid being in this situation again?'" Schramko explained. The answer, the seasoned entrepreneur revealed, is to create a need for the agenda of the meeting. The next time someone requests to meet, ask for help or ideas, and take up a portion of his valuable time, he will be sure to clarify the details first: what the meeting is about, where it will take place, and whether it will involve coffee or a meal, depending on the arrangements made.

"When you’ve got challenges in your business, ask yourself the question," Schramko encourages. It's best to have a whiteboard handy for this purpose; writing the question at the top of the board helps one focus on the matter at hand, and the answer one comes up with — or answers contributed by friends or peers — can be written underneath it for evaluation and further discussion.

Of course, the question for the day (derived from the latest challenge faced) must be a relevant, hard-hitting one — one that will certainly help improve and grow a business. Good examples could be "How do I drive extra traffic to my business without using Facebook?" or "How do I convert more of the traffic that comes to my website without changing the offer?"

"In other words, how do I improve the usability or the conversion process?" Schramko emphasizes as he wraps up the business update. Asking questions after a particularly relevant business experience or occurrence forces one to value clarity. "It forces innovation, and hopefully, it’s a self-diagnostic questioning technique that’s going to grow your business," he adds.


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