The Vet Tech Guide Adds Extended Information About Veterinary Tech Specialties

The Vet Tech Guide has released additional guides about specialties in the veterinary technician field. The VetTechGuide.org provides vet techs with the necessary information needed to earn a specialty in the growing and rewarding field of animal health.

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Vet Tech Guide

Vet Tech Guide

Becoming a specialist vet tech provides a wide variety of career benefits: many public and private organizations prefer to employee certified specialists.

Phoenix, Arizona (PRWEB) January 28, 2013

The Vet Tech Guide has released additional guides about specialties in the veterinary technician field. The VetTechGuide.org provides vet techs with the necessary information needed to earn a specialty in the growing and rewarding field of animal health.

A vet tech specialist is an individual who has gained additional training and experience in order to work in a selected specialized field of veterinary medicine.

A specialty is mostly for the vet tech that has gained work experience in the field prior to deciding to become a certified specialist technician. It is impossible to become a specialist vet tech directly upon graduating from a vet tech program. Specialist technicians usually works closely with veterinarians in an assistive or supporting role.

Specialist vet techs must generally have at least three years of full-time experience and be able to document practical and academic training in the specialty they are seeking certification for.

Some of the more popular specialties recognized by the HAVTA include.

Dental Technology Specialty
Equine Veterinary Nursing Specialty
Nutrition Specialty

In addition, new specialties are added on a regular basis, so vet techs should regularly check with the Vet Tech Guide or the NAVTA to determine if a specialty of interest to them has been added.

Becoming a specialist vet tech provides a wide variety of career benefits. Importantly, many public and private organizations prefer to employee certified specialists, rather than those who have not yet demonstrated their skill in the specialty field. The added and higher levels of training specialists obtain often allow them to command a higher wage in addition to contributing to a greater degree of job security in an already in-demand field.

Case in point, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the annual mean wage for colleges, universities and professional schools is over $37,000, compared to an annual mean wage of just over $29,000 for all vet techs. This strongly indicates that those veterinary techs with a specialty may be able to obtain a higher income than those who have not become a credentialed specialist.

For more information about how to advance your career as a specialist in one of the vet tech specialty fields, including information and resources on specific schools and programs in each state, please visit the VetTechGuide.org

Contact:
Artur Ciesielski
602.492.8004
Absolute Exhilaration, LLC runs several health related websites in the human and animal health fields, that, address information and resources for those interested in a career in the medical industry.


Contact

  • Artur Ciesielski
    Absolute Exhilaration, LLC
    (602) 492-8004
    Email