5 Tips for Avoiding Dull, Lifeless Casino Customer Service Training Announced by Robinson & Associates

Dull, lifeless casino customer service training is wasted on employees who want to do a better job on the casino floor, but five tips announced by Robinson & Associates, Inc., can help properties avoid that problem.

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Casino Customer Service

The worst thing that can happen during casino customer service training is a dull presentation that puts employees to sleep.

Boise, ID (PRWEB) November 16, 2012

One of the worst things that can happen during casino customer service training is a dull presentation that puts employees to sleep. Robinson & Associates, Inc., has announced five tips that will help casinos avoid that problem and get the most out of their training investment.

“When I think about dull training, I can’t help but picture Alan Greenspan, the former chairman of the Federal Reserve, and he’s precisely the kind of facilitator casinos don’t want,” says Martin R. Baird, chief executive officer of Robinson & Associates, a guest service consulting firm to the global gaming industry. “Greenspan spoke with his head down and he mumbled into the microphone. At times he was hard to follow. And everyone in the audience had to read between the lines because he never addressed any issue directly.”

Baird suggests casinos take the following tips to heart so that they can avoid employee training sessions that are a waste of time and money.

Prevention Is the Best First Step. The best way for casinos to circumvent dull training is to demand a presentation from a prospective facilitator before making a hiring decision, Baird says. “If the presenter can’t make a one- or two-hour talk fun and interactive, the casino should think long and hard about making an investment in that person,” Baird notes. “It shouldn’t cost much more for effective training than it does for a talking head.”

Use Participant-Centered Training. Most adults learn through lecture and reading, but this approach has the lowest retention level of all types of learning, according to Baird. “Casino training needs to be participant centered,” Baird says. “It should be active so participants experience the learning process using all their senses. Studies have shown that as a person uses more and more of their senses during a learning experience, their retention level increases.”

Make the Experience Fun. “When people have a good time, they’re more open to new ideas and concepts,” Baird says. “This means they’re open to learning. Training should be fun and educational. That’s not an oxymoron. Learning and fun go well together.”

Offer Outstanding Content. For training to be meaningful, it must offer first-rate information that’s specific to the gaming industry, according to Baird. “The presenter should talk about real customer service challenges that hard-working, front-line employees face on an hourly basis,” Baird notes. “If the quality of the content is not considered along with the effectiveness of the delivery, it’s almost assured the end result will be a less-than-great learning experience.”

Present the Information Carefully. Dynamic delivery and outstanding content are of no use if the information cannot be understood, Baird says. “People can’t be forced to read between the lines or figure out complex information like Greenspan did with his audiences,” Baird says. “Spoon feed the information with just enough fun to make it go down easy.”

About Robinson & Associates

For nearly 20 years, Robinson & Associates, Inc., has been dedicated to helping casinos improve their guest service so they can compete and generate future growth and profitability. A Boise, Idaho-based consulting firm to the global gaming industry, Robinson & Associates is the world leader in casino guest experience measurement and improvement. For more information, visit the company’s Web site at http://www.casinocustomerservice.com or contact Lydia Baird, director of business development, at 208-991-2037 or lbaird(at)raresults(dot)com. Read about casino customer service improvement at Martin R. Baird’s blog at http://www.mbaird.blog.com. Robinson & Associates is a member of the Casino Management Association and an associate member of the National Indian Gaming Association.


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