Sporting Goods Wholesaling in China Industry Research Report – Now Available from IBISWorld

In the five years through 2013, revenue for the Sporting Goods Wholesaling industry in China has been increasing at a rate of 6.9% annually to an estimated $33.1 billion. The global recession and unfavorable macroeconomic conditions in China resulted in slow growth in 2009, but as the economy recovered so did the industry, says IBISWorld.

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IBISWorld industry market research
New and existing sporting goods wholesalers have significant opportunities to expand market share

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) March 23, 2013

In the five years through 2013, revenue for the Sporting Goods Wholesaling industry in China has been increasing at a rate of 6.9% annually to an estimated $33.1 billion. The global recession and unfavorable macroeconomic conditions in China resulted in slow growth in 2009, but as the economy recovered so did the industry. In the past five years, the main factors driving industry performance have been higher consumption in China, large sporting events hosted by China, such as the Olympic Games, and the country's active involvement in international trade within the World Trade Organization framework, says IBISWorld.

The top four companies in this industry are expected to account for less than 10.0% of total revenue in 2013. This industry is therefore subject to a low level of concentration. About 80.0% of industry enterprises are small scale, with annual revenue totaling less than $360,000, says IBISWorld. There has not been significant merger or acquisition activity occurring in the industry in recent years. Goods handled tend to be of a complex nature, and large players often span a number of industries. Therefore, only a small share of revenue comes from large-scale operators. For example, Li Ning Company Limited also sells sporting clothes for leisure purposes, which are not classified in this industry.

Many large sporting goods manufacturers like ANTA and DHS have established sales companies that incorporate the wholesale function; these firms tend to achieve higher profitability than independent wholesalers in the Sporting Goods Wholesaling industry in China. Other large companies like Adidas and Li Ning have adopted a light-assets business model, which involves outsourcing most of their manufacturing and retail functions to upstream and downstream enterprises. Both industry concentration and globalization are very low, therefore, significant opportunities exist for players to expand, says IBISWorld.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Sporting Goods Wholesaling in China industry report page.

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IBISWorld Industry Report Key Topics

The Sporting Goods Wholesaling industry in China includes wholesalers of sports merchandise used for games and training such as sporting equipment, apparatus and clothing. Sporting goods wholesalers are a key link between manufacturers and retailers.

Industry Performance
Executive Summary
Key External Drivers
Current Performance
Industry Outlook
Industry Life Cycle
Products & Markets
Supply Chain
Products & Services
Major Markets
Globalization & Trade
Business Locations
Competitive Landscape
Market Share Concentration
Key Success Factors
Cost Structure Benchmarks
Barriers to Entry
Major Companies
Operating Conditions
Capital Intensity
Key Statistics
Industry Data
Annual Change
Key Ratios

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    IBISWorld
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