Dr. Atul Madan Explains The Difficulties of Losing Weight Just by Diet and Exercise

Diet and exercise is a must for people who want to keep from gaining or regaining weight, says Dr. Atul Madan, in agreement with an April 10, 2013 Fox News report (“How to Keep Weight Off”), but that may not be best for those who have large amounts to lose. Dr. Madan reviews an October 27, 2011 article by Time (“Why Dieters Can't Keep the Weight Off”) and suggests the LAP-BAND® system as an initial weight loss solution.

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The Weight is Over. Choose LapBand®

Los Angeles, California (PRWEB) May 12, 2013

Diet and exercise is good and necessary – many health professionals agree on that. There have been many good articles written, such as the April 10, 2013 Fox News report on “How to Keep Weight Off” (foxnews.com/health/2013/04/10/how-to-keep-weight-off/) that have offered tips, advice, and guidance on keeping pounds from creeping up. However, Dr. Madan specialist in bariatric surgery says that many of these helpful guidelines are only helpful to those who don't already have 50 to 100 pounds of extra weight. He points to an October 27, 2011 article by Time magazine, “Why Dieters Can't Keep the Weight Off”, as an indication that extra weight causes extra biological problems with cravings that lead to weight regain. Dr. Madan suggests that it may be a solution to have a LAP-BAND® installed in order to lose weight, with supplementary diet and exercise habits to keep weight regain from happening after weight loss surgery.

First, says Dr. Madan, lap band surgery is certainly not a cure-all – that should never be said to patients. However, many research studies point to the fact that simple diet and exercise alone does not always lead to satisfying weight loss, once the weight has been put on. The Time article mentioned a small Australian study of 50 dieters, who went through an intense 10-week diet program, only to gain back 50% of what they had lost after a two-year period.

What was even more discouraging about the report were those who dropped out – more than 20% of the original 50 participants dropped out before 8 weeks had been completed, which could have been due to the 550 calorie limit or the required 10% weight loss. Dr. Madan says that this is not unheard-of, even for those who have the lap band installed. Some have the lap band removed, though whether that's due to enough weight loss or not enough, hasn't been fully confirmed in current research. However, he notes, most of those who do have the lap band installed for more than two years experience an average of at least 50% weight loss, even with some patients experiencing weight regain.

Although later results from the Time study were more encouraging – an average of 30 pounds' weight loss – counseling and a normal diet were not enough to keep 12 pounds from creeping back on. The culprit, according to Time, was the dieter's own body: “a symphony of hormonal changes sends the body relentless signals to slow metabolism and increase the urge to eat, for at least a year after weight loss”. The drop in leptin levels, due to loss of fat, signals the body that it needs more energy, which results in a cycle of hunger pangs and even slower metabolism. The body turns to “fight or flight” mode because the body thinks that starvation is imminent, when mere weight loss is the goal.

This does not mean that those wanting weight loss are doomed to ride an endless cycle of weight loss and regain, says Dr. Madan. It may mean that the first year after trying to lose weight by diet and exercise will be extremely hard, as evidenced by the 16 people out of 50 that dropped out of the Australian study. What it does mean is what lap band patients often hear: the battle has just begun.

Diet and exercise aren't the enemy, but the body will put up a fight. According to the April 10, 2013 Fox News article (“How To Keep Weight Off”), the average woman in America adds on an extra pound per year after reaching age 40. (This may explain why so many lap band patients are women, says Dr. Madan.) After age 30, muscle tissues successively gives way to fat, and many patients who struggle with obesity have already had childhood and teen years marked by extra weight. This makes help with weight loss even more imperative after age 30 and 40.

While eating fewer calories is less work than a workout, it's clear that muscle burns more calories than fat – up to three times as much even while the body is at rest. Lack of estrogen in women is also key, so after age 40, cravings tend to increase just as weigh moves from hips and thighs toward the waist, which is the most unhealthy area for extra weight. Exercise can keep this to a minimum, as well as the cortisol levels (a 'stress hormone') that increase the desire for fat-filled comfort foods. Lap band surgery can help cut down on cravings, since the amount of food allowed to pass through the stomach is much reduced, and after the first month of recovery, it's quite normal for patients to be able to do light exercise (such as walking) at least two to three times per week. That habit of regular exercise, says Dr. Madan, will do more for patients to keep weight from being regained, than any short-term diet plan.

After performing 2,000 and more bariatric procedures, from Roux-en-Y gastric bypass to lap band surgery, Dr. Madan can be considered an expert in weight loss surgery. After graduating from Lehigh University and obtaining a medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania, Dr. Madan was first in Memphis to conduct a laparoscopic gastric bypass. He was also the first to offer a treatment without incision for weight gained post-operatively. He was awarded the 2007 SAGES Young Investigator Award, and his satisfied patients gave him an even better 2011 and 2012 Patients' Choice Award.

For more information on Dr. Madan or the LAP-BAND procedure, call 1-800-472-4900, or lap band cost go on http://www.thelapbandcenter.com/


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