Narconon Arrowhead Accelerates Drug Education Services Due to Youths’ Exposure to “Bath Salts”

As legislators rush to strengthen anti-bath salts laws, Oklahoma drug rehab Narconon Arrowhead pours the coals on their delivery of drug prevention lectures in schools

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We are happy to play a role in ensuring our youth can grow up strong and drug-free,” concluded Niko. “We will keep participating in this effort until we win the battle.

(PRWEB) March 19, 2013

When “bath salts” – a dangerous synthetic drug – started being abused in the US, Oklahomans were hit as hard as the rest of the country. This drug associated with serious assaults on others and self-harm soon sent dozens of Oklahomans to hospital emergency rooms. When recent evidence showed that young schoolchildren in Oklahoma were being exposed to this drug, Narconon Arrowhead responded by boosting their drug education efforts.

“Schoolchildren as young as twelve and thirteen are coming up after my drug prevention lectures to ask if bath salts are bad,” said Niko Bain, Narconon Arrowhead’s drug prevention specialist. “This means we must continue to expand our outreach program to schools.”

Since Niko started delivering drug education lectures to schools in Oklahoma, Kansas and Arkansas, he has built up the average number of children hearing the lectures to 800 a week. Many mornings, he leaves the drug rehab facility near McAlester, Oklahoma while it’s still dark so he can reach the far corners of Oklahoma or the neighboring states.

“Just since the beginning of the year, we’ve had more than 140 new inquiries for drug prevention lectures or our rehab services, as a result of these classes,” he said. “We’re going to continue to expand so we can protect our next generation from synthetics like bath salts and Spice.”

When Niko goes out to schools, students crowd around him at the end of his talk, wanting to know about bath salts and Spice more than any other type of drug. “It’s obvious they are hearing about the drug or even seeing people abuse it while they are still in middle school,” he added. One teacher told Niko about an Oklahoma elementary school student who created a disturbance on a school bus because he was high on bath salts.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma legislators are addressing the problem with new legislation to improve the ability of law enforcement to seize the drug and prosecute sellers. On March 6th, HR 2217 passed in the House and went to the Oklahoma Senate. While there was already legislation in existence banning some of the chemicals that make up bath salts, the constantly changing formulas for this drug required an expansion of the law. For that reason, Representative David Derby sponsored HR 2217.

“We are happy to play a role in ensuring our youth can grow up strong and drug-free,” concluded Niko. “We will keep participating in this effort until we win the battle.”

So far this year, Narconon Arrowhead drug education services are poised to exceed the number of students instructed the prior year. For more information on Narconon Arrowhead drug rehabilitation or prevention services, call 1-800-468-6933 or visit http://www.narcononarrowhead.org.


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