Vapor Protection Services Educates Environmental Consultants at IAQA in Nashville About Using Radon Technology for Vapor Intrusion Concerns

Vapor Protection Services, A Premier Design and Build Contractor of Sub-Slab Depressurization Systems (SSDS/ASD) for the environmental consulting industry educates consultants on radon technology for mitigation of vapor intrusion (VI) concerns during the International Air Quality Association Show this week in Nashville, Tennessee. Vapor Protection Services cautions consultants that experience counts when applying radon technology properly for successful outcomes

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Radon Mitigation Contractor

Radon Mitigation Contractor

Testing for sub-slab air flow and volume along with conducting a thorough site assessment in regarding to building construction and soil composition will help radon contractors provide accurate cost estimates and work plans for mitigation.

Indianapolis, Indiana (PRWEB) March 19, 2014

Environmental consultants face growing concerns about the effects of vapor intrusion on indoor air quality at the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) Annual Expo in Nashville, TN where Vapor Protection Services is helping educate consultants on using radon technology to mitigate VI concerns when installed in adherence to EPA and State Guidelines regarding vapor mitigation.

Vapor Protection Services, a sub-contracting company specializing in mitigating harmful gases from indoor air space, is sharing their experience this week at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville. Nicolas Martinez, Director of Technical Services for Vapor Protection Services, says in a recent article, radon mitigation and vapor intrusion (VI) mitigation share many similarities in system design and components, but there are differences in approaches to design and installation of mitigation systems that will ensure proper performance for consultants.

Mitigating vapor intrusion is different than mitigating radon, the source of which is never reduced over time. Mitigating volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) such as chlorinated solvents, PCE, TCE and benzene sometimes occurs alongside remediation measures controlling the source in the surrounding soil and ground water in order to remove harmful vapors over time, explains Martinez.

Differences in mitigation can be fairly striking when preparing to install an effective and sub-slab depressurization system: Prior to installation of a radon mitigation system, field communication testing is not required. Not true with vapor mitigation, says Joseph Miller, Accounts Manager for Vapor Protection Services. Field communications is crucial to designing effective vapor mitigation systems. The advanced diagnostic step is what Miller and technical advisor Nicolas Martinez are urging consultants at IAQA to consider before writing budgets. Testing for sub-slab air flow and volume along with conducting a thorough site assessment in regarding to building construction and soil composition will help radon contractors provide accurate cost estimates and work plans for mitigation. This step saves money and headaches, says Martinez, who has designed systems for well over a million square feet in the last two years for Vapor Protection Services. As vapor intrusions concerns grow with industry awareness of how gases enter indoor air space from contaminated groundwater and soil, questions regarding qualifications for contractors and mitigation standards will be raised and answered only by the most experienced vapor mitigation contractors.

If you have any questions regarding Vapor Protection Services, individuals are encouraged to log on at http://vaporprotection.com or by calling 317-252-5295.

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