SunshineBloggers Urges Readers to Recycle

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Following an August 22nd article in The Atlantic Cities, titled “People Are Less Likely to Recycle Stuff That’s Crumpled, Cut Apart, or Deformed,” SunshineBloggers discussed the merits of recycling, and the importance of recognizing everyday objects that can be recycled.

In the wake of an August 22nd Atlantic Cities article, titled, “People Are Less Likely to Recycle Stuff That’s Crumpled, Cut Apart, or Deformed,” SunshineBloggers urged readers to acknowledge the presence of recyclables in all shapes and forms. Recyclables are present in the form of most bottles, plastics, and disposable ice chests. Styrofoam, as found in ice chests and packing materials, are also recyclable. Before throwing out everyday items, search for a recycling stamp.

John Metcalfe, in his above-mentioned Atlantic Cities article concerning recycling, discussed a study recently conducted by The Journal of Consumer Research that found consumers were less likely to recycle items that appeared to be damaged, or that were not whole. The study took two groups of people, one with whole papers, the other with cut up paper, and studied their reactions when confronted with a trash can and recycling bin. Majority of those with cut up paper were found to have simply thrown the paper away, while those with whole sheets of paper leaned toward throwing the papers in the recycling bin. This challenged the idea of recycling, as it suggested that consumers may not be recycling objects that are considered broken, or in poor condition, despite the physical condition of an object’s irrelevance in the recycling process.

Following the study recounted in Metcalfe’s article, SunshineBloggers urged readers to regard all potential recyclable products before simply throwing them away. If an item is broken, or in otherwise poor condition, be sure to recycle it anyway, as recycling companies do not place importance on an items physical condition; most recyclable materials are melted or compacted, rendering the physical condition of an object irrelevant to the usefulness of the product. In addition, check with local recycling companies; though most cities’ curbside recycling programs accept only glass, paper, and plastic, many recycling companies will accept larger, more infrequently recycled objects, such as styrofoam food coolers, packing materials, and wood. Before throwing anything out, make sure it cannot instead be recycled.

John Metcalfe is a staff writer for The Atlantic Cities, working primarily with environmental issues, as well as covering national issues, including national weather patterns and economics.

Following a study referenced in an article by John Metcalfe, SunshineBloggers encouraged readers to place greater focus on recycling, taking time to locate recycling centers and pay attention to different recycling symbols. In addition, JIA urged readers to disregard an items state, whether out of embarrassment or uncertainty, and recycle all items made of recyclable material, both preserving a greater balance in the production of new items, and lessening the country’s environmental footprint.

About SunshineBloggers:
SunshineBloggers.WordPress.com/ is an online resource for environmental news and articles regarding lifestyle, finance, and product choice.

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