Agencies to Lose Over 10 Percent of Their Leadership with New Administration

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According to a recent report from INPUT, the authority on government business, some agencies stand to lose more than 10% of their leadership teams after the upcoming change in administration.

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The loss of leadership, program proponents, influencers, and innovators during the transition, in conjunction with ongoing difficulties in the recruitment and retention of IT and acquisition staff, means that contractors must broaden their relationship bases throughout customer agencies

According to a recent report from INPUT, the authority on government business, some agencies stand to lose more than 10% of their leadership teams after the upcoming change in administration. Many contractors are waiting until after the election to begin preparing for the administration transition, but the void created by departing appointees requires contractors to start developing transition strategies now. Contractors face the loss of program advocates and government expertise and should develop strategies now to solidify relationships with career personnel as they work to position programs for incoming appointees.

The Department of Education, Department of Homeland Security, and Department of Labor stand to lose 22.2%, 14.4%, and 11.4% of their leadership, respectively. This is primarily a result of the increased numbers of appointees in the Bush Administration, which consists of 12% more political appointees and 33% more Schedule C appointees (those with policy-determining responsibilities or who serve in a confidential relationship to a key official) than the Clinton Administration. As a result, some agencies face significant losses of management and policy executives.

Until the new leadership is in place, agencies will be in somewhat of a holding pattern. New leadership will likely mean new priorities, and contractors need to identify those agencies facing the most significant leadership changes now. “The loss of leadership, program proponents, influencers, and innovators during the transition, in conjunction with ongoing difficulties in the recruitment and retention of IT and acquisition staff, means that contractors must broaden their relationship bases throughout customer agencies,” states Deniece Peterson, senior analyst with INPUT. Contractors who begin planning for the human capital impact now will be better positioned in the next administration.

These findings and others were released in an INPUT Industry Report, Industry Leaders’ Guide to the 2008 Administration Transition: Capturing Mindshare in the New Administration. More details are available at http://www.input.com/corp/library/detail.cfm?ItemID=4468.

Editor's note: To speak with the report author regarding this release, please contact Helena Brito at hbrito @ input.com or 703-707-4161.

About INPUT
INPUT is the authority on government business. Established in 1974, INPUT helps companies develop federal, state, and local government business and helps public sector organizations achieve their objectives. Over 1,300 member organizations, including small specialized companies, new entrants to the public sector, and the largest government contractors and agencies, rely on INPUT for the latest and most comprehensive procurement and market information, consulting, powerful sales management tools, and educational & networking events. For more information about INPUT, visit http://www.input.com or call 703-707-3500.

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Helena Brito
INPUT
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