New Book Touts Red Wine Pill as Tonic for Aging Adults

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A red wine pill may add years to the human healthspan. In his latest book, health journalist Bill Sardi says resveratrol pills may help maintain a sharp mind and motor skills (balance and coordination) even into very old age.

Most people don't know what to make of this discovery yet

A red wine pill may add years to the human healthspan. In his latest book, health journalist Bill Sardi says resveratrol pills may help maintain a sharp mind and motor skills (balance and coordination) even into very old age.

Mankind had better do something fast, says health journalist Bill Sardi. "Humans are living longer and unless they can find a way to slow down aging, society will be overwhelmed by a population of immobile and senile seniors," he says.

The maladies of modern man, obesity, diabetes, strokes, heart disease, cancer and senility can largely be avoided by adherence to a limited calorie diet. But few humans have the willpower to deprive themselves of food. However, the discovery that a red wine molecule mimics the health benefits of a limited-calorie diet may be one of the greatest discoveries of all time, says Sardi, author of The Red Wine Pill.

Modern medicine has yet to develop a medicine better than red wine. Yet the drawbacks of alcohol have kept doctors from recommending wine to their patients. So the advent of a red wine pill looms as one of the biggest developments in healthcare.

According to a recent article published in the New York Times, Dr. Richard A. Miller, a pathologist at the University of Michigan, a pill that mimics the effects of calorie restriction might increase human life span to about 112-140 years.

The New York Times article goes on to cite a report by the Rand Corporation, that such a pill would be among the most cost-effective breakthroughs possible in medicine, providing Americans more healthy years at less expense than new cancer vaccines or stroke treatments.

But Sardi says the prospect of a life-prolonging pill has arrived unexpectedly. "Most people don't know what to make of this discovery yet," he said. Sardi says the primary reason why adults haven't adopted red wine pills into their daily health regimens is because they want to hear that such a pill increases the quality as well as the quantity of life.

In his book, Sardi points to Jean Calment, the oldest woman to have lived in modern times (122 years), who was a wine drinker and rode a bicycle at the age of 100 and had a sharp mind (she was able to tell jokes) at the age of 115.

"Given that one in four Americans over age 80 are in nursing homes, and others suffer physical and mental debilitation, the promises of a red wine pill should be welcome news," says Sardi, who played a role in developing such a pill.

Sardi says the health benefits of red wine are now largely attributed to resveratrol, a small molecule that has been shown to activate the Sirtuin 1 DNA repair "survival" gene. "The benefits of wine drinking are only found among moderate drinkers," says Sardi, who quotes an old saying: "At the third cup, wine drinks the man."

In his book, Sardi cites the discovery of a population of middle-aged Italian immigrant men, living in Roseto, Pennsylvania in the 1960s-1970s, who were virtually free from heart attacks. At the time there was no explanation for this. Upon review, it was found these Italian men were importing their beloved red wine from Italy and drinking three glasses a day. "We now know why these men lived such healthy lives," says Sardi.

The book The Red Wine Pill is available at http://www.naturalhealthlibrarian.com

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WILLIAM SARDI
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