Superor Nose Jobs Do Not Look Like Someone Else's Nose

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Repeat rhinoplasty or nose jobs aren't uncommon, reports Dr. Jeffrey Raval of Denver, CO, who is known as "The Nose Guy" for his exceptional surgical capabilities in repeat nose jobs. "The issue with a repeat nose surgery is always the scar tissue," says Dr. Raval, F.A.C.S. and triple board certified facial plastic surgeon with American Board certifications in head and neck surgery, otolaryngology and plastic surgery.

I make a point of taking the time to discuss with the patient their concept of what the surgery will do for them

Google Jennifer Aniston and 18,900,000 results pop up in less than 19 seconds, among them teasing headlines like "Aniston and John Mayer caught kissing again" to a report by Fox News in 2007 that Aniston has had a second nose job by Indian plastic surgeon Raj Kanodia, the second surbery to correct a first for a deviated septum done a dozen years ago. The surgeon is also reportedly the plastic surgery solution to Jessica Simpson and Cameron Diaz, the article by Catherine Donaldson-Evans on the FX website, owned by News Corp. the parent company to FOX News.

Repeat rhinoplasty or nose jobs aren't uncommon, reports Dr. Jeffrey Raval of Denver, CO, who is known as "The Nose Guy" for his exceptional surgical capabilities in repeat nose jobs. "The issue with a repeat nose surgery is always the scar tissue," says Dr. Raval, F.A.C.S. and triple board certified facial plastic surgeon with American Board certifications in head and neck surgery, otolaryngology and plastic surgery.

Patients frequently seek out Dr. Raval for their repeat nose job when they're not happy with the surgery performed by another plastic surgeon. Sometimes these patients come from states away, says Dr. Raval who is not afraid to tell a potential patient who wants unreasonable surgery that they're not a good candidate for cosmetic surgery.

"I make a point of taking the time to discuss with the patient their concept of what the surgery will do for them," says Dr. Raval. "If they're scheduling surgery to please someone else or expect their lives to become altogether different, new and improved because of a surgical procedure, they will not be pleased with the outcome, even when the surgery is flawless."

No surgical procedure makes everything about one's life perfect, Dr. Raval adds.

Take, for instance, Jennifer Aniston. Even though she had a first nose surgery, she still ended up divorced from her husband, Brad Pitt. And although she underwent a subsequent corrective nose job to trim the wideness of her nose, she still suffered heartbreak, falling in and out of love. She was incessantly pursued by the paparazzi. Reports about Jennifer's every move, whether it was true or not, were widely circulated, particularly when she was expected to be at the same event as her ex, Brad, and his new wife Angelina Jolie.

Nose jobs are done for many reasons, not the least of which is to simply correct the appearance of the nose. Other reasons for nose surgery include restoring breathing function in the case of a patient whose breathing is limited because the inside of the nose is crooked (called a deviated septum). Many patients have noses that are outsized like their parent or other family member, consistent with their DNA of origin. Surgeries to minimize the size of a nose or to correct a bump on the nose are often performed on teens in their mid-teen years.

"The outcome for a teen patient who has been ridiculed or teased because of the size or shape of their nose is almost always highly positive," says Dr. Raval. "A good nose job eliminates the object of this ridicule and torment. Now if a teen has a big nose and a repulsive attitude or other offensive behavior, chances are nose surgery won't do a thing to endear others to him/her or to make the teen feel better about him or herself."

"That would be a case where I would suggest to a parent that the child be seen by a counselor who could help the teen work through his or her emotional issues to better understand what is causing issues in interaction in the first place," Dr. Raval says.

In his years in practice, Dr. Raval has had many, many patients who've had nose jobs tell him that the surgery has improved their lives.

Sometimes patients combine surgery to correct a deviated septum along with surgery to correct the appearance of the nose. When Dr. Raval is minimizing a nose or removing a bump, his overriding concern is that the nose be consistent with the rest of the patient's facial characteristics. "In the '60s patients who came in wanting a nose job might want theirs to be made into a small pixie nose. But those days thankfully ended when the objective of cosmetic surgery became more focused on making a patient look natural as well as beautiful, absent exaggerated change or an over-surgerized noses," says Dr. Raval.

The decision to opt for a nose job is one that requires a patient to take appropriate time off rigorous activities to recover. Following rhinoplasty, the nose is packed with dressings that must remain in place for several days. Then for about a week to 10 days, the patient is advised to not sniff their nose or blow their nose. Instead they're instructed to gently dab at any discharge with a tissue. Once the nose has begun to heal, the mucous plug, that at first functions as a sort of protective cover, will naturally dry up and release from the inside walls of the nostrils. Follow-up visits to the doctor will check to confirm that the healing process is going as is expected and the swelling and tenderness that occurs will minimize as the nose heals completely.

"Just because you like the noses the celebrity twins Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen breathe out of, doesn't make that same nose ideal for you," cautions Dr. Raval. "By the same token, it can be tough on a child to have a nose that attracts attention for all the wrong reasons."

Dr. Raval can be reached at 303-744-2300 or visit his website at Raval Facial Aesthetics - Denver

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Jeffrey Raval, MD, FACS

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