Oncor Wants You Prepared for the Worst : Oncor has top three electrical safety tips for National Preparedness Month

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This month marks the fifth annual National Preparedness Month. Oncor wants to help all Texans prepare for the worst by educating them on what to do to prevent electrical-related injuries. The best way you can be prepared is through educating yourself and your family.

Additional Lifetime of Safety Resources

Safety is Oncor's No. 1 priority, and it should be one of yours, too, during National Preparedness Month and all year. In honor of that, here are Oncor's top three electrical safety tips from its year-round Lifetime of Safety campaign to follow and share with your family:

    1.   Make a storm safety kit -- Yes, we know it's September, but bad weather can still happen. Additionally, these kits are good for whenever an electrical outage occurs, whether it is storm-related or not. Storm safety kits should include a combination of the following: flashlight, bottled water, radio, pen and paper, extra batteries and a storm safety card from http://www.oncor.com/safety. Other than the card, most of these items can be found in hardware stores.

    2.   Perform the Lifetime of Safety Home Safety Checklist, an electrical safety home audit -- Going through this safety checklist, which consists of a checklist of common indoor and outdoor electrical hazards, can point out potential electrical dangers that need to be addressed before they become problems. Many problems can be fixed by the homeowner, although some may require a qualified electrician. Visit this month's Lifetime of Safety Web page at http://www.oncor.com/safety to view Oncor's audit, located in the "Additional Lifetime of Safety Resources" box.

    3.   Beware of power lines -- Contact with power lines can seriously injure or even kill someone. Teach your family, including children, to beware of power lines. If you see a downed power line, leave the area and call 9-1-1. In addition to the downed line potentially being electrified, anything touching the power line, such as a tree branch, could also be electrified. Do not touch the power line or anything else touching it. If your vehicle comes into contact with a power line, it and the ground around it may be electrified. It is safer to stay in the vehicle and wait until Oncor arrives to shut off power. Only leave if you are in imminent danger, then jump free of the vehicle, as far as you can, and hop to safety with both feet together.

To view a diagram of a storm safety kit, download an audit or view other electrical safety tips from Oncor's Lifetime of Safety program, visit http://www.oncor.com/safety.

Oncor is a regulated electric distribution and transmission business that uses superior asset management skills to provide reliable electricity delivery to consumers. Oncor operates the largest distribution and transmission system in Texas, providing power to 3 million electric delivery points over more than 102,000 miles of distribution and 14,000 miles of transmission lines. While Oncor is a subsidiary of Energy Future Holdings Corp., Oncor is a separate entity with a separate board that is comprised of a majority of independent directors.

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Megan Wright
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