Simcoe, Grey and Bruce County Beach Towns Draw Millions to Lake Huron Shoreline

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Wasaga Beach, the longest freshwater sandy beach in North America and Sauble Beach, the second longest welcome summer tourists

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The cave itself is stunning, with sunlight from the outside revealing a brilliant underwater tunnel on the inside. Tourists can walk along a ledge inside its cavity or swim in its cool, clear, turquoise water.

The Lake Huron shoreline in Simcoe, Grey and Bruce Counties comes alive each summer with the arrival of millions of tourists and summer residents to Beach Towns that have come to shape the shoreline since the 1920s. With over 89 beaches with public access located in the region just a short drive from the Greater Toronto area and 1,000 kilometres of Lake Huron shoreline, the Simcoe, Grey and Bruce county beaches are considered the Florida of the north for Ontario beaches. Wasaga Beach boasts 14 kilometres of white sand, making it the longest freshwater sandy beach in the world while 11 kilometres of golden sand afford Sauble Beach the enviable title of the world’s second longest freshwater beach. Wasaga Beach alone draws over 2 million visitors each year to the rapidly growing community and the kitschy beach shops, beachy accommodations, cottages and beach fries make Sauble Beach the quintessential beach town.

Many festivals and events take place on substantial public urban waterfronts in Simcoe, Grey and Bruce County. Visitors are drawn to the water to experience the unique atmosphere only found in a lakeside town, to take in the vista, play water sports from kite surfing to jet skiing, swim, jog on the kilometres of pristine beaches and enjoy time with family and friends over a locally inspired meal at an outdoor café. Other notable beaches include Kincardine’s Station Beach, Port Elgin Beach, Southampton Beach and Balm Beach. There is even a nationally recognized Grotto in Bruce Peninsula National Park, the most popular attraction in the Ontario park. Carved out by the waves of the Georgian Bay, visitors hike to the Grotto where they climb down through the natural chimney in the rock of the Niagara Escarpment. The cave itself is stunning, with sunlight from the outside revealing a brilliant underwater tunnel on the inside. Tourists can walk along a ledge inside its cavity or swim in its cool, clear, turquoise water.

The Lake Huron shoreline is also noted for its incredible beach sunsets. Be sure to catch the Phantom Piper in Kindardine that sends chills down the spines of visitor’s each evening or the sunset behind Chantry Island in Southampton, rated the 2nd best in the world by National Geographic.

For more information on all the things to do in Simcoe, Grey and Bruce Counties, Google your favorite location and book your hotel today.

About RTO7
Regional Tourism Organization 7 (RTO7) is a tourism organization encompassing the counties of Grey, Bruce and Simcoe in Ontario. RTO7 is led by a volunteer, industry-led board of directors consisting of 15 voting members drawn from private and non-private tourism businesses and organizations across Bruce, Grey and Simcoe to represent the interests of Region 7 tourism.RTO7 was incorporated as a not-for-profit corporation in December 2010 and the first board of directors (http://region7transition.ca/cms/board) is in place. RTO7 will work collaboratively with its tourism partners and stakeholders to enrich the region's diverse tourism experiences in order to sustain and grow visitation, investment and tourism receipts. For more information, visit the website at http://www.region7transition.ca

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Kathi Black
RTO7
905.990.0079 113
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