Scanner as Camera Part II, at Float Gallery, Presents the Works of Direct Digital Capture with Scanner by Jennifer Anderson and Beau Daignault

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Float Gallery presents this time the works of direct digital capture by Jennifer Anderson and Beau Daignault. Both have engaged in capturing live instants with digital scanners and deliver very dramatic visual results.

Float Gallery presents this time the works of direct digital capture by Jennifer Anderson and Beau Daignault. Both have engaged in capturing live instants with digital scanners and deliver very dramatic visual results.

Jennifer is a delight of softness and precision in her treatment of digital captures when Beau prove that time can be stretched at will and traveled in many places.

The exhibition will begin on October 7th to end on October 28th. Opening reception on October 14th, 6-10 p.m.

The gallery opening days are: Tuesday to Sunday, 1 – 7 p.m.

The gallery is closed on Monday.

The show includes original digital prints.

About Jennifer D. Anderson

The combination of hand processes and digital imaging within Jennifer’s work serves as a metaphor for the complexity of the human form and life, a constant theme within Jennifer’s work.

Having received a MFA in printmaking from The University of Georgia in 2001, Anderson’s work has been exhibited in both national and international venues and is included in several public and private collections including the Royal Museum of Fine Art, Antwerp, Belgium. Upcoming exhibitions of Jennifer’s work will include shows in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Champaign, Illinois.

Presently Jennifer is a studio artist and educator in Santa Monica, CA. For more information please see: http://www.jenniferdanderson.com

Beau Daignault explaining the making of his photos.                

Beau Daignault recently began to create photographs tinged with a bit of surrealist, or, biomorphic cubism. Avoiding photo assemblage (too close to collage) and disdainful of multiple exposures and ‘Photoshopping’ (not pure enough), he set out to make still-life and figurative images realized wholly in-camera with no external trickery. Because scanner photography is a new form of photography, he wish to start at the beginning, so to speak, and employ devices that were used in early photography, for example in “mise en scène.”

About the Camera

These photographs were created with a scanner camera.

A scanner camera consists of an ordinary still camera integrated with a flatbed scanner; the image is stored onto a computer. The scanner takes the place of the film. To build his first scanner camera, Beau used a 1930's Kodak 620 attached to a heavily modified flatbed scanner. His latest camera uses a 1940's Speed Graphic Combat Edition 4 x 5 field camera, joined to a flatbed scanner powered with batteries.

Both of these artists are exploratory and innovators in their use of scanners. They also are showing us new visual spaces that are characteristic of digital treatment.

About Float gallery.

Float gallery opened in June 2006 in Marina del Rey, California.

The gallery is dedicated to the digital community in that it is the place where digital artists can show their works and demonstrate their art and mastering of the digital tools.

Float gallery will show every month a new exploration into the digital space by inviting artists who are at the leading edge of art by using technologies like stereolithograpy, liquid paper, holograms etc..

Float gallery is located in the heart of Marina del Rey in California.

The address is 14025 Panay Way, Marina del Rey, CA 90292 – USA.

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