School for Troubled Teens | Tips for Parents of Troubled Teens on Communication | New Tips Announced by Eagle Ranch Academy

Share Article

School for troubled teens Eagle Ranch Academy announces new tips for parents on teen communication. What characteristics and mechanisms help a parent with better teen communication?

School for Troubled Teens

School for Troubled Teens

Teenagers are just emerging from the wonderful carefree world of children; the best time in anyone's life really when it comes to cares and worries.

School for Troubled Teens | Tips for Parents of Troubled Teens on Communication

All people have troubles from time to time. Adults have plenty; chances are if a parent still lived in their family home with their parents, their parents would be distressed and upset with them too, even if they were over fifty years old. But, adults usually have the insight to know they must deal with problems themselves, and reason them out with intelligence.

Teenagers are just emerging from the wonderful carefree world of children; the best time in anyone's life really when it comes to cares and worries. Their main job is school; their main way to avoid being bored is playing; their main deception is stealing one too many cookies. Then, puberty happens. The teen is going through all kinds of physical and emotional changes. This is the time when many teens cannot handle the peer pressures, and some parents send their children to a school for troubled teens. If there is a time in their lives when they will reject parental advice, look at their parents with a negative eye or think they know best, this is it. Wise parents will learn how to get through the years with a troubled teen, by improving the number one problem: communication.

•Empathy. A parent should put themselves into their exact situation like it was them. Feel their discomfort or pain. The parent should ask themselves what they would be doing or saying to their parent. Visualize their problem, complaint or attitude with open-mindedness.

•Patience. When a teen is talking, ranting or even yelling, remain silent until they have paused or are through. Yelling in the middle of the episode will do nothing but aggravate. Just give them their undivided attention, which is usually what they want.

•Reword their request, statement or complaint. The parent should make sure they understand what the child means, but putting it into other words, and asking, “is this what was meant?”

•Always use positive words versus negative whenever possible. Instead of saying, “that hair is hideous,” use words like “that last hair style was amazing.” Instead of “Jim is so annoying!” it would be better to focus on the friends the parent does like; “I really like Tom.” If the parent hates the piercing the teen has put in their lip, they could present it as “those lips are the prettiest lips in the family, it would be a shame to harm them.”

Unless a teen has a serious mental illness, eating disorder or drug problem, which all entail outside help such as sending them to a specialized school for troubled teens; most parents and teens can get through the teenaged years intact. It becomes great conversation subjects when life delivers the same to them someday.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jim Arslainian
Follow us on
Visit website