Educational Neuroscience Has Implications for Teaching and Learning

In Solution Tree’s newest release, Differentiation and the Brain, leading researchers share the latest findings on how neuroscience supports the learner-friendly classroom.

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The implications of these discoveries for educational practice will improve how teachers teach and how students learn. We’re proud to release a book that will help educators understand and utilize educational neuroscience to improve their classrooms.

Bloomington, IN (Vocus) October 26, 2010

Solution Tree, a leading educational professional development company, has released Differentiation and the Brain, a new book that explores the emerging field of educational neuroscience and what it means for the future of teaching and learning.

Differentiation and the Brain, by David A. Sousa and Carol Ann Tomlinson, examines the basic principles of differentiation in light of what current research on educational neuroscience has revealed. This research pool offers information and insights that can help educators decide which curricular, instructional, and assessment choices are likely to be more effective than others.

Teachers need to find ways to utilize the latest in brain research to develop strategies that will allow students to succeed in classrooms that contain a diverse mix of abilities, cultures, and languages. The authors offer suggestions on how to establish and manage differentiated classrooms without imposing additional heavy burdens on teachers.

“Research is revealing so much about how the brain learns,” said Jeffrey C. Jones, president and CEO of Solution Tree. “The implications of these discoveries for educational practice will improve how teachers teach and how students learn. We’re proud to release a book that will help educators understand and utilize educational neuroscience to improve their classrooms.”

David A. Sousa, PhD, is an international consultant in educational neuroscience and author of several books that suggest ways educators and parents can translate current brain research into strategies for improving learning. A member of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, he has conducted workshops in hundreds of school districts on brain research, instructional skills, and science education at the pre-K–12 and university levels.

Carol Ann Tomlinson, EdD, is a faculty member at the University of Virginia Curry School of Education. She is the William Clay Parrish Jr. professor and chair of educational leadership, foundations, and policy. Dr. Tomlinson codirects the university’s Institutes on Academic Diversity. She was named outstanding professor in the Curry School of Education in 2004 and received an All University Teaching Award in 2008.

About Solution Tree
Solution Tree is a leading provider of comprehensive, research-based professional development solutions for K–12 educators. For more than 20 years, Solution Tree has worked with the world’s premier authors and brightest minds in education. The company transforms education by empowering educators to successfully address today’s most challenging problems and to create schools where all students succeed. Learn more at http://www.solution-tree.com.

Contact:
Solution Tree
Bethany Harvey
800.733.6786 ext. 262

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