Attorney Stacie Patterson Releases Mindful Communication Tips

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A new study from UCLA found that many doctors could benefit from communications training, to ensure they’re providing patients with the most accurate information about prescriptions.

When you’re faced with having a challenging conversation—something that’s a common occurrence for attorneys, therapists or physicians—its successful resolution may very well depend on your ability to engage in mindful communication.

A new study from UCLA found that many doctors could benefit from communications training, to ensure they’re providing patients with the most accurate information about prescriptions. That’s good news to Attorney Stacie Patterson, who specializes in professional license and criminal defense, since she’s a huge proponent of mindful communication, even when the situation isn’t life or death, and has released mindful communication tips that will benefit any professional.

“In most communications situations, being mindful is not a requirement,” Patterson said. “However, when you’re faced with having a challenging conversation—something that’s a common occurrence for attorneys, therapists or physicians—its successful resolution may very well depend on your ability to engage in mindful communication.”

Patterson notes that mindful communication is a process through which listeners are engaged in a way that leads to moving forward in a mutually beneficial direction. She acknowledges that it sounds easier than it is.

“All mindful communication begins with self-examination, since you need to know ‘where you are’ before you initiate any potentially combative conversation,” Patterson said. “This includes having a mindful presence—eliminating as much stress as you can before you get started—and taking care not to project your own issues during the dialog.”

Patterson agrees with the five mindful communication keys highlighted by Susan Gillis Chapman in her book, The Five Keys to Mindful Communication:

  •     We-first communication. Create an intention for the conversation.
  •     Mindful presence. Begin the conversation on positive note, with an awake body, tender heart and open mind.
  •     Encouragement. Keep a level playing field during the conversation and encourage the expression of vulnerable feelings.
  •     Gentle speech. Make sure not to shut down, use justifications, ignore feedback, and get carried away by personal thoughts or emotions.
  •     Unconditional friendliness. Break the cycle of having a heartless mind and a mindless heart.

“I’m a big believer in Chapman’s red-yellow-green light approach, which provides all the tools necessary to engage in a natural communication—“green light”—system,” Patterson said. “This mindful way of communicating will yield far better results than will ever be achieved via confrontations, which are inherently uncomfortable and often result in a rocky road moving forward.”

Stacie Patterson is a San Diego professional license defense attorney. Whether you’re facing a professional complaint or a criminal conviction, Ms. Patterson provides honest, straightforward representation. She also practices criminal defense in the areas of drug charges, sexual offenses, probation revocation and more.

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