Cyber Security for Tomorrow: Priority for Stanford Professor John C. Mitchell, Recipient of the 2009 Dean's Award for Industry Education Innovation

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Stanford University's John C. Mitchell, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, has been at the forefront of Web and network security research and education for more than a decade, working to educate professionals in the full spectrum of challenges that confront today's increasingly online world. The Stanford School of Engineering is proud to announce Mitchell as the 2009 recipient of the Dean's Award for Industry Education Innovation.

Companies enjoy working with John -- he has a wealth of ideas and really enjoys making these connections

The enormous spike in Web data and privacy breeches in 2008 can take people to the gov report on security threats and high profile thefts and viral scares of 2009 have re-energized an international focus on 21st century cyber security, privacy and trust issues. These include: assuring personal financial and health data privacy, protecting national infrastructure systems, and thwarting a host of new cyber threats (SQL injections, drive-by downloads, botnets, rootkits, etc.). Stanford University's John C. Mitchell, Professor of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, has been at the forefront of Web and network security research and education for more than a decade, working to educate professionals in the full spectrum of challenges that confront today's increasingly online world. The Stanford School of Engineering is proud to announce Mitchell as the 2009 recipient of the Dean's Award for Industry Education Innovation.

On every front, Mitchell's teaching and crucial research dovetail with current and future industry needs. "John is a stellar industry educator," says Neil Daswani, Mitchell's co-instructor for Stanford's Advanced Computer Security Certificate Program. The six-course program provides participants the advanced skills needed to learn how to protect networks, secure electronic assets, prevent attacks, ensure customer privacy, and build secure infrastructures. "Through this certificate program and through his service on a variety of CIO-level committees and corporate advisory boards, he has helped train hundreds of expert-level professionals in the area of cyber security - an area in which our country and the world desperately needs more engineers, as recently acknowledged by President Obama's cyber security policy."

Teaching ability is also crucial in considering this award, and after twenty years, Mitchell remains a popular teacher. Students point out that he understands the differencing needs of industry and PhD/graduate students, and knows how to teach to both. "He explained core concepts subtly, so that we could understand the relationship between complex mathematical theories and their application in software security," says Omkar Deo, Advanced Computer Security Certificate Program participant. "This is critical because often times we know a solution exists, but we don't know how it was arrived at. Professor Mitchell's teaching helped bridge that gap."

Finally, developing a cutting-edge security curriculum for engineers is one of Mitchell's top priorities, both at Stanford and beyond. He recently presented a plan for an industry supported computer security curriculum to the Team for Ubiquitous Secure Technology (TRUST), a National Science Foundation-backed multi-university and industry organization to transform organizations' ability to design, build and operate trustworthy information systems. This enthusiasm to assure consistent, quality cyber and computer security education, and to share crucial security theory and innovations with other education, industry, and government leaders, permeate Mitchell's work beyond the classroom or the lab. "Companies enjoy working with John -- he has a wealth of ideas and really enjoys making these connections," Suzanne Bigas, Assistant Director of the Stanford Computer Forum , concludes. "John produces great students who go out into the world and do great things. He has made more contributions toward industry education than I can possibly mention."

About John Mitchell

John C. Mitchell is the Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, co-director of the Stanford Computer Security Lab faculty director of the department's industry affiliates program, the Computer, and co-chair of the Forum's annual Security Workshop. His security research interests include identity theft, Web and network security, trust management, and distributed access control.

About the Stanford Center for Professional Development:

The Stanford Center for Professional Development connects working professionals worldwide to the research and teaching of Stanford University faculty in the School of Engineering and related academic departments. Qualified individuals may study for master of science degrees on a part-time basis, pursue graduate and professional certificates, take individual graduate and professional courses, participate in workshops, view free online seminars and more. Courses are delivered online, on the Stanford campus in the heart of the Silicon Valley, and at the work site.

Visit: Stanford Center for Professional Development

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