Syracuse Personal Injury Lawyer Says Recent Snowmobile Accidents Call for Renewed Focus on Safety

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Scott C. Gottlieb of the Law Offices of Scott C. Gottlieb & Associates, LLP, says snowmobile riders injured because of others’ negligence need to protect their rights.

It’s easy but wrong to think of snowmobiles as more like fast sleds than small cars or motorcycles, but they are powerful motorized vehicles that can maim or kill on impact.

A Syracuse-based personal injury attorney says a recent rash of snowmobile accidents in upstate New York points to the need for snowmobile enthusiasts to be safety minded.

“Many snowmobile accidents are caused by reckless actions, such as driving while intoxicated or driving too fast, and negligence, such as failing to look out for others on the trail,” said Scott C. Gottlieb of the Law Offices of Scott C. Gottlieb & Associates, LLP. “Recent reports of accidents show an alarming number of injuries and a fatality that were likely avoidable.

“New snowmobile riders should take safety courses, and even experienced riders should take the time to review or renew their safety skills,” Gottlieb said.

In the first several days of February various media reported that:

  •     A 47-year-old Ontario County woman died after the snowmobile she was riding struck a car in the town of Gorham.
  •     A Wayne County man was seriously injured in a snowmobile crash in Arcadia.
  •     A Genesee County man was injured in a snowmobile crash in Pembroke.
  •     A snowmobiler in the Buffalo area was injured in a fall down a ravine.
  •     Two Durhamville men were injured when their snowmobiles collided with a fallen tree on a trail in New London.

The state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation says reported snowmobile accidents increased by about 11.5 percent between the winter of 2007-08 and 2008-09, from 285 to 318.

The state of New York has more than 10,300 miles in the Statewide Snowmobile Trail System in 47 counties, which is funded through 55 municipal sponsors. The state requires snowmobile riders under the age of 18 to complete a state-sponsored snowmobile safety course.

“It’s easy but wrong to think of snowmobiles as more like fast sleds than small cars or motorcycles, but they are powerful motorized vehicles that can maim or kill on impact,” Gottlieb said. “People who survive snowmobile accidents can find themselves coping with serious injuries, such as brain and head injuries, broken limbs, neck injuries and damage to internal organs.”

Gottlieb said those who have been injured in a snowmobile accident should consult an attorney about protecting their legal rights.

“People harmed by the negligence of others have a right to consideration for lost wages, medical bills, pain and suffering, and other expenses, and may be due compensation,” he said.

“We have stood as advocates for many New Yorkers in the Syracuse area and throughout the state who have been injured or who have lost love ones in accidents, and we’ve helped them recover compensation they were justly due,” Gottlieb said. “Don’t walk away and say ‘accidents happen.’ We’ve seen too many accidents that should never have happened.”

About Scott C. Gottlieb & Associates, LLP

The Law Offices of Scott C. Gottlieb & Associates, LLP, handle all types of personal injury and motor vehicle accident cases, including cases involving cars, trucks, motorcycles, ATVs, snowmobiles and boats. The firm also represents clients in actions for wrongful death, cancer misdiagnosis, dog bites, hunting accidents, birth injuries, brain injuries, construction accidents, fall down injuries and insurance settlements. The firm regularly employs accident reconstruction experts, investigators, photographers and economists to assist in evaluating and preparing personal injury cases. Scott C. Gottlieb & Associates has offices in Binghamton, Elmira, Rochester, Syracuse and Watertown. For more information, call (800) TALK-LAW or use the firm’s online contact form.

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