Craig Watkins: T-Shirt Designer, Illustrator - Graphic Designer Interview

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Craig Watkins has been a freelance illustrator since 1999. Working with a diverse range of clients like Disney, Billabong, DreamWorks and Urban Outfitters has enabled him to hone his skills and develop a portfolio of work that most anyone would enjoy. Craig is currently the Creative Director at DesignByHumans.com (an on-line artist community and t-shirt competition site) by day and a freelance machine during the night. He was recently interviewed by iloveyourtshirt.com.

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Craig Watkins

I still feel my style is developing but I also know my style is recognizable now, that was something I always wanted. - Craig Watkins

Craig Watkins has been a freelance illustrator since 1999. Working with a diverse range of clients like Disney, Billabong, DreamWorks and Urban Outfitters has enabled him to hone his skills and develop a portfolio of work that most anyone would enjoy. He paints, doodles and draws the world just as he sees it. Craig likes to develop characters with a strong narrative and then drags them kicking and screaming into darkness. Watkins uses traditional materials and digital packages to create his art. Craig is currently the Creative Director at DesignByHumans.com by day and a freelance machine during the night. 'No rest for the wicked' is his motto.

Craig's interview can be read here: http://iloveyourtshirt.com/new,Craig-Watkins-T-Shirt-Designer-Graphic-Designer-Illustrator-Interview

About T-Shirts

The t-shirt (also known as tee shirts or tees) evolved from undergarments used in the 19th century, through cutting the one-piece "union suit" underwear into separate top and bottom garments, with the top long enough to tuck under the waistband of the bottoms. By the Great Depression, the t-shirt was often the default garment to be worn when doing farm or ranch chores, as well as other times when modesty called for a torso covering but conditions called for lightweight fabrics.

Tee-shirts, with and without buttons, were adopted by miners and stevedores during the late 19th century as a convenient covering for hot environments.

T-shirts, as a slip-on garment without buttons, originally became popular in the United States when they were issued by the U.S. Navy during or following the Spanish American War. These were a crew-necked, short-sleeved, white cotton undershirt to be worn under a uniform. It became common for sailors and Marines in work parties, the early submarines, and tropical climates to remove their uniform "jacket", wearing (and soiling) only the undershirt.

Named the t-shirt due to the shape of the garment's outline, it soon became popular as a bottom layer of clothing for workers in various industries, including agriculture. The t-shirt was easily fitted, easily cleaned, were made in various colors and patterns and inexpensive, and for this reason it became the shirt of choice for young boys.

The most popular method of printing t-shirts is screen printing, however, the interest in direct to garment Printing (DTG) which is the process of using inkjet printers to print an image directly onto t-shirts without the use of screens like with screen printing, is increasing at a steady rate. In addition, DTG printing uses eco-friendly, water soluble ink, unlike some screen printing methods that layer Plastisol (a suspension of PVC particles in a plasticizer) on top of the t-shirt. The only requirement for DTG printing is for the image to be high resolution, resulting in photograph quality printing with no setup fee or minimums.

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