Numerous Labyrinths to Open in Taos, Beginning June 28, Take Center Stage Among Visitors

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Volunteers Needed to Help Create New Labyrinths

Labyrinth, photo by Sandra Wasko Flood

It’s more of an experience than simply walking in a circle; it fosters transformation.

Taos is known to be at the center of a thriving art community, but it is also becoming the best place to feel more “centered” thanks in part to it’s many sacred places and the growing number of labyrinths cropping up in the Town. In fact, beginning on June 28 and continuing through September 19th, more than a dozen labyrinths will open in Taos and only for a limited time, depending on the location.

“Taos is naturally a sacred and spiritual place - from its land to its history - similarly, labyrinths can be very spiritual. Labyrinths have a way of helping you find what you are looking for - whether that happens to mean resolving a conflict, making a decision or for any another purpose,” said Taos labyrinth organizer and founder of Living Labyrinths for Peace (Washington, DC), Sandra Wasko-Flood. “It’s more of an experience than simply walking in a circle; it fosters transformation.”

Labyrinths have been around for nearly 4,000 years and used in many ancient cultures for major life celebrations. Labyrinths have been studied and have been shown to slow breathing, and bring a peaceful state of mind. They symbolize life’s journey and, unlike mazes, have only one path to the center and back, so a person cannot get lost. Today, labyrinths are found in places such as parks, churches, retreat centers, schools and playgrounds and of course, at many locations in Taos.

A schedule of upcoming labyrinth openings in Taos, and volunteer opportunities to create labyrinths, are as follows:

June 2010

  •     Saturday, June 28 through July 31 at El Monte Sagrado Living Resort and Spa: Labyrinth Sacred Spaces Classic Feather Labyrinth - open to hotel guests in daytime. Call (575) 737-9840 for details or visit http://www.grandbohemiangallery.com.

July 2010

  •     From July through September at San Geronimo’s Lodge: Full Moon Labyrinth Walks after sundown. The Lodge is located at 1101 Witt Road, Taos, NM. Call (575) 751-3776 for more information or visit http://www.sangeronimolodge.com.
  •     From July through October at Adobe and Pines Inn, mulch labyrinth and zen garden from 7 a.m. to dusk. The Inn is located at 4107 N.M. 68, Taos, NM. Call (575) 751-0947 or mail(at)adobepines(dot)com for more information or visit http://www.adobepines.com.
  •     July 4-Aug 31 at E.L. Blumenschein Home and Museum: Walking the Santa Rosa Labyrinth, open during daylight hours. The Museum is located at 222 LeDoux Street Taos. Call (575) 758-0505 or blume(at)taoshistoricmuseums(dot)org or visit http://www.taoshistoricmuseums.com
  •     July 4 ONLY at Touchstone Bed and Breakfast Inn: Labyrinth Sacred Spaces at the Cretan Labyrinth event featuring a Drumming Labyrinth Walk at 3:00 p.m. The Inn is located at 110 Mabel Dodge Luhan Lane Taos, NM. Call (575) 758-0192 for more information or visit http://www.touchstoneinn.com.
  •     July 18 at First Presbyterian Church: Dedication of Medieval Chartres Cathedral Style Labyrinth. The dedication, led by Rev. Wayne Mell, takes place after 11 a.m. on July 18 but labyrinth is open during daylight hours, year-round. The Church is located at 215 Cam Del Paseo Pueblo Norte, Taos. Call (575) 758-3124 or wmell(at)questoffice(dot)com for more.
  •     July 19 through Aug 1 at Kit Carson park: Pima Man-in-the-Maze labyrinth. Open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. The Park is located at 211 Cam Del Paseo Pueblo Norte Taos, NM. Call (575)377-6369 for more information.
  •     July 29 at Harwood Museum of Art: Labyrinths for Creativity and Peace Children’s Workshop from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., will give 20 3rd and 6th grade students an opportunity to walk labyrinths in order to stimulate creativity, express wishes, make decisions, resolve conflicts and find a path from inner peace to world peace. Students will create Labyrinth Books and paint a 12 foot square canvas labyrinth which they dedicate to their school. Call (575)758-8626 x 105 to register your child. The Museum is located at 238 Ledoux Street Taos, NM. Visit http://www.harwoodmuseum.org for details.
  •     July 29 at Harwood Museum of Art: Introduction to the labyrinth from 7 p.m to 9 p.m. Adult workshop on history of labyrinths and more. Call (575) 377-6369 or email Sandra Wasko Flood at waskoart(at)comcast(dot)net for more information or visit http://www.harwoodmuseum.org.
  •     July 30 at Harwood Museum of Art-Children’s Gallery: The Birth of the Labyrinth workshop featuring light boxes, photo etchings and more at 5 p.m. Call (575) 377-6369

August 2010

  •     Aug. 21 at Taos Convention Center: Deep Caves to Deep Space: Journeying with the Labyrinth Through Human History, 9 a.m to 6:30 p.m. features a three part workshop on origins of labyrinths in the caves of France. Cost: $120 w/ $40 pre-registration fee. Located at 120 Civic Plaza Dr. Taos. Call 800-323-6338 for details or visit http://www.taosconvention.com.
  •     Aug. 23 through Oct 1 at Millicent Rogers Museum: Labyrinths for Peace 2000 Photo Exhibit of labyrinths from around the world and at U.S Capitol. Opening with Reception on August 28th from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Museum located at 1504 Millicent Rogers Rd Taos, NM. Call (575) 758-2462 for details or visit http://www.millicentrogers.com.

September 2010

  •     September 9 through 12 at Angel Fire Resort Lodge- Alliance Studying Paranormal Experiences (ASPE) Conference. Labyrinth outside, workshops, etc. Call Janet Sailor at (575) 377-2667 or js(at)accessmedianm(dot)com. Cost $175 or visit http://www.aspefiles.org for details.

Other labyrinths, outside of Taos, can be found at: 1) Stardreaming, in Santa Fe, which features a series of labyrinths that can be experienced year round, by appointment only. Contact JamesJereb at (505) 474-5847; 2) Angel Fire Artspace Gallery in Angel Fire, featuring Labyrinth Sacred Spaces Exhibit by artist Sandra Wasko-Flood. Officially opens July 23rd and continues Tuesday through August 3 from 10 a.m. to 4p.m. Call (575) 377-6273 for details; 3) then on Sept 19th, the Mandala Center in northeastern New Mexico will celebrate an “International Day of Peace” with a Peace Pole Dedication labyrinth dedication from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m, which includes music and more. Call (575) 278-3002 or director(at)mandalacenter(dot)org for details.

Because several labyrinths are slated to open soon, organizers are asking for volunteers who would like the rare opportunity to participate in the actual process of creating the intricate labyrinths.

Three upcoming opportunities to be involved in the creation of the labyrinths are as follows:

  •     Sunday, June 27 at 10 a.m. -volunteers needed to build a Classic 7-circuit turkey feather labyrinth at El Monte Sagrado Living Resort located at 317 Kit Carson Road, Taos, NM 8757. Bring a hammer and Phillips screwdriver to dig holes.
  •     Friday, July 2 at 10 a.m. - volunteers needed to build a Santa Rosa gravel labyrinth at the Blumenschein Home and Museum located at 222 LeDoux St., Taos, NM
  •     Saturday, July 17 at 10 a.m. - volunteers needed to man the informational tables (tables manned July 19 through August 1), and build a Man in the Maze labyrinth at Kit Carson Park located at 211 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos.

The creation of a labyrinth can take anywhere from two hours to half a day, and requires basic knowledge or interest of labyrinths. Labyrinths are first created by sketching out the design, measuring and walking in the circle to ensure the right proportions, and finally the labyrinth rocks are put into the ground to create the final design. The labyrinth design combines the circle and the spiral form found throughout the universe from the galaxies to our DNA, which is a symbol for wholeness, unity, and transformation.

To volunteer or for more information on labyrinths, contact Sandra Wasko-Flood at waskoart(at)comcast(dot)net or (575) 377-6369 or (703) 217-6706 for more information.

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Erica Asmus-Otero
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