Birth of Pennsylvania Coalition of Taxpayer Associations (PCTA) Gives Harrisburg Cause To Be Concerned

For the first time in the history of Pennsylvania, taxpayer groups across the Commonwealth have united. These groups have formally organized as the Pennsylvania Coalition of Taxpayer Associations (PCTA).

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Douglassville, PA (PRWEB) July 23, 2006

For the first time in the history of Pennsylvania, taxpayer groups across the Commonwealth have united. These groups have formally organized as the Pennsylvania Coalition of Taxpayer Associations (PCTA). To date, the group consists of 19 taxpayer organizations and is gaining momentum as word spreads across the state of their organization.

What prompted the formation of this Coalition is the Legislature’s inability to effectively address property tax issues and enact meaningful legislation that is beneficial to all taxpayers.

On Friday July 21st, the first official meeting of PCTA took place at the Capitol Building in Harrisburg. Sixteen of the taxpayer advocacy groups were represented from across the Commonwealth. PCTA deliberated for 4 hours in a session that was closed to reporters and lawmakers.

They emerged with two signed resolutions that will be sent to Governor Rendell and the Legislature. The first resolution calls for the repeal of Act 1. The resolution recognizes that it gives only the lowest income senior citizens property tax relief while ignoring the rest of property owners in the state who pay astronomically high property taxes. The Coalition wants everyone to realize the massive fraud that has been perpetrated on the people of Pennsylvania.

The Coalition wants the Legislature to focus on property tax reform. The goal is to, at minimum, eliminate school district property taxes for primary residences, and fund public schools with state revenues. Some coalition members advocate the elimination of all school district property taxes while others want to eliminate all primary residential property taxes. All groups in PCTA agree that property taxes are crippling the taxpayers of Pennsylvania and must be addressed now with meaningful legislation from Harrisburg.

The Coalition recognizes that no matter what the funding source is for education, it needs cost controls. The second resolution passed supports a recently proposed bill by Representative Will Gabig, which calls for prohibiting teacher strikes in Pennsylvania.

More information can be found regarding the member organizations of PCTA on the DBTA website. To arrange an interview with any of these organizations, receive copies of resolutions, or for any additional information, please contact Cheryl Zaleski, Director of Communications.

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