TechCrunch 2007 Conference: Twenty20 Previews New Way to Shoot Video in Motion and Share it Online

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Sneak peek of wearable, hands-free video camera and video sharing site: 'The Next YouTube Powered by a Camera?'

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VholdR changes all of that. VholdR's 'Hands-free Shoot, Click-to-Share' design will make shooting and sharing video in motion easy for everyone, even the Dad who wants to record the excited faces of his family from the front seat of the corkscrew roller coaster.

Seattle Internet startup Twenty20 previewed "VholdR" and "VholdR-TV" at the TechCrunch 2007 Conference, held in San Francisco on September 17-18. VholdR is the company's code name for its next generation "wearable" video camera--a small, lightweight, yet rugged, camera specially designed for capturing video in motion. VholdR software will automatically upload video to VholdR-TV, the place to share video online.

Twenty20's VholdR weighs just a few ounces, fits in the palm of your hand, but it's armored: with its brushed aluminum body the camera works in rain, snow, and mud. VholdR records video to an internal SD card. Small grooves on VholdR's body are designed to couple with various mounts so the camera can be used anywhere--or even worn. A single on/off button makes VholdR the ultimate in simplicity to use, even with gloved hands. Easy-to-use software quickly organizes the video and offers a "Click-to-Share" option to post the video online.

For years, sports enthusiasts captured video in motion with helmet cams--a nice name for a mess of lenses, wires, and batteries strapped to their heads. The heavy and unbalanced contraptions were cumbersome, and always expensive. Sharing the video online didn't risk life or limb, but it did require hours of tedious editing and uploading. The target of the uploaded video was usually a social networking Web site, where friends and family could watch the recorded athletic exploits in awe--and safety.

"Everyone wants to shoot video in motion, but few can do it. It's just too hard," explains Twenty20 founder Marc Barros. "VholdR changes all of that. VholdR's 'Hands-free Shoot, Click-to-Share' design will make shooting and sharing video in motion easy for everyone, even the Dad who wants to record the excited faces of his family from the front seat of the corkscrew roller coaster."

"Some people call our approach 'the next YouTube powered by a camera,'" quipped Jason Green, co-founder of Twenty20. "I guess that's OK. I think more people would upload and share video if it was easier to do--if the camera enabled sharing as part of the process."

VholdR will ship with "Click-to-Share" software that automatically uploads video to the Twenty20 Web site and YouTube.

"But, the videos our camera owners will upload will be unique," adds Barros. "The community of people on our Web site will be sharing something special: videos episodes from inside the action--their experiences from their point of view. We expect to see some amazing things."

Barros expects VholdR to be available in limited quantities in December 2007.

Seattle-based Internet startup Twenty20 invents easy ways to "Shoot and Share" video in motion. Twenty20 products are sold through a network of sports retailers and also online. For more information, visit http://www.Twenty20camera.com.

TechCrunch is a Weblog founded by Michael Arrington and dedicated to reviewing new Internet products and companies. The TechCrunch 2007 Conference showcases the 40 hottest startups from around the world, and their products that are poised to change the Internet. Twenty20 was selected from over 700 applicants from 26 countries to demonstrate their product at the TechCrunch Conference, and to compete for recognition as one of the hottest 40 companies. For more information, visit http://www.techcrunch20.com.

Contact: Marc Barros, CEO, Twenty20 Inc., Mountlake Terrace, WA, 866-397-6920, marc @ twenty20corp.com, http://www.Twenty20camera.com.

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