Testosterone Legal Expert Ken Rothweiler Comments on FDA Investigation into Testosterone-Boosting Products

Philadelphia Fox-29 legal analyst and dangerous drugs attorney Ken Rothweiler explains why drug companies are obligated to warn consumers and doctors about the alleged heart attack risks associated with “Low T” testosterone therapies.

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Because of the lack of a warning, doctors aren’t always aware of the risks when they prescribe these medications to patients. The drug companies’ obligation is to warn consumers and physicians about the possible side effects.

(PRWEB) March 05, 2014

Following a study published on January 29 in the journal PLOS One finding that popular testosterone-boosting drugs could raise men’s heart attack risk by two to three times, the FDA announced on January 31 the launch of an investigation into the safety of these testosterone medications for treating “Low T.”

When dangerous drugs lawyer Ken Rothweiler and a physician affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center were interviewed on Fox-29's Good Day on February 21, they explained that the use of prescription testosterone products for treating low testosterone levels, also known as “Low T,” has increased radically. This is largely due to advertising by testosterone products manufacturers such as AndroDerm®, AndroGel®, Axiron®, Bio-T Gel®, Delatestryl®, Fortesta®, Striant®, Testim® and Testopel®. According to The New York Times article published on February 3, sales of these products were estimated at $2 billion in 2012. That same year, three million prescriptions were written for the market leader AndroGel® alone.

“The number of testosterone prescriptions given to American men with low testosterone has tripled since 2001, and physicians often don’t check men’s hormone levels prior to writing a prescription,” Rothweiler has said. “Millions of men are likely taking prescription testosterone medications they don’t even need.”

The National Institutes of Health-funded study confirmed that prescription testosterone therapies can double the risk of a heart attack in men over age 65 and triple this risk for younger men with a pre-existing heart condition.

“Because of the lack of a warning, doctors aren’t always aware of the risks when they prescribe these medications to patients,” Rothweiler said on Fox 29. “The drug companies’ obligation is to warn consumers and physicians about the possible side effects.”

Ken Rothweiler is part of a legal team comprised of him, Alex MacDonald and Jon Ostroff, all leaders of law firms with many years of experience handling drug injury cases against the big pharmaceutical companies. Together, the Rothweiler, MacDonald, and Ostroff led team is providing quality legal representation for the victims of testosterone-boosting products.


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