Treatments for Depression Often Ineffective; Study Shows That Many Would Benefit From Alternative Treatment Methods

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A research study conducted to compare patient attitudes on treatments for depression reveals that the majority struggle to find effective treatment. HealthTree.com to test new anonymous video polling technique.

With the diversity of responses from the research, we are particularly interested in testing a new interactive method for patient education aimed at helping those struggling to find a depression treatment that works. Our goal is to provide individuals with the knowledge they need to take control of their health, and we’re using increasingly new technology to do so

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Despite the variety of depression treatments available, those suffering from depression often have difficulty finding a treatment plan that works. Results from a recent depression treatment poll conducted by HealthTree.com revealed that patients with depression often don’t respond well to traditional treatments, and many discontinue their treatment plan due to ineffectiveness or intolerable side effects. Of particular interest, the study found that the majority of those suffering from depression try three or more treatments to alleviate their symptoms, and 35% of respondents have tried five or more depression treatments.

The survey sampled 1,238 self-reported or diagnosed depressives. Of the total respondents, over 70% were diagnosed with clinical depression, with the remainder considering themselves depressive. The study asked respondents how they had attempted to treat their symptoms, how many treatments they have tried, and their reasons for switching or ceasing treatment. The vast majority of those polled (85%) had tried traditional treatments for depression--prescription drugs and psychotherapy--and had attempted at least three different treatment options. Most respondents (60%) believed that anti-depressants are over-prescribed by doctors. These findings suggest that those suffering from depression are often dissatisfied with traditional treatment options and may benefit from exploring alternative depression therapies.

“With the diversity of responses from the research, we are particularly interested in testing a new interactive method for patient education aimed at helping those struggling to find a depression treatment that works. Our goal is to provide individuals with the knowledge they need to take control of their health, and we’re using increasingly new technology to do so,” said Dr. Regan Carey, the Project Director for the study.

While traditional depression treatments are ineffective for many patients, still others are reluctant to try them at all. According to a recent study published by the New York Times, as many as 25% of pregnant women suffer from depression, and a large percentage of those women are hesitant to take antidepressants during pregnancy. The same study suggests that alternative treatments can provide relief from depression symptoms.

For more information, visit http://www.healthtree.com/articles/depression/treatment/major/

Full survey results are available upon request from HealthTree.

About HealthTree.com

HealthTree provides personalized health information for consumers to make better, more informed decisions about their health. HealthTree offers personalized information that integrates, and links to, the abundance of information available in communities, blogs, and social media information flow.
Contact:

Emily Sweeney, Senior Editor
Tree.com
1.858.750.7850
http://www.tree.com

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Emily Sweeney
Tree.com
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