Tree Pruning Reduces Risk for Denver and Colorado Front Range Property Owners

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Dead branches observed by Colorado front range property owners and managers in June may signal increased risk of damage and liability. Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care strongly advises pruning.

Pruning reduces liability while improving the health and beauty of the tree.

Property owners should consider risk to power and telephone lines.

A warm dry fall and winter followed by a cool and wet May is a perfect breeding environment for stem-inhabiting bacteria and fungi. The resulting frailty of trees and branches creates a liability issue for Colorado Front Range property owners and managers.

Low levels of snowfall in Colorado this winter have proven conducive to tree and shrub diseases. Surface roots, which provide water and nutrient intake for trees, have desiccated and died. Abundant rains experienced in May came too late to help many trees and shrubs and in fact may have exacerbated risks to people and property. Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care strongly recommends property owners and managers in Denver and the Colorado Front Range place priority on tree pruning.

“A warm dry fall and winter followed by a cool and wet May is a perfect breeding environment for stem-inhabiting bacteria and fungi. The resulting frailty of trees and branches creates a liability issue for Colorado Front Range property owners and managers,” said Tom Tolkacz, CEO of Swingle.

Once established, some infestations spread beyond the affected tree. Fire blight in crabapple trees, for example, can spread by wind, rain and pollinating insects. Twigs affected by fire blight curl and turn black, looking as if they have been burned.

Swingle does not offer legal advice but Tolkacz offers, “from the experience and perspective of a Colorado business owner,” responsible property owners and managers in Denver and the Front Range should ask themselves: Did the person(s) responsible for the care of the property act in a reasonable fashion? Could any damage resulting from an affected tree have been foreseen and prevented?

Inspection from a licensed landscape professional or qualified arborist can provide answers. Swingle provides on-site estimates at no charge and with no obligation.

“An arborist may be able to find areas of concern not readily visible to the layperson,” said Tolkacz. “Examples include early signs of tree decay or nests of bees or squirrels in a hollow. These violate the integrity of the tree and can cause trees or tree parts to fall unexpectedly.”

About Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care
Founded in 1947, Swingle Lawn, Tree and Landscape Care has grown to one of the largest residential and commercial landscape care companies in Colorado, employing more certified arborists than any other Colorado company. For more information, please contact Aaron Dennis at (303) 337-6200 or visit http://www.myswingle.com.

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