Veodia High Quality Video Service Turns Events into New Revenue Channels -- MIT Technology Review and Office 2.0 Conferences Boost Audience Numbers and Profits

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Hosting events can appear to be risky to some, but on balance, executive events mean big bucks from business executives who will pay dearly to listen to and rub elbows with demonstrators and thought-leaders. It's one thing generate revenue with the "butts in seats" model, yet there are other ways to continue to monetize the event content for a very low upfront cost to the organizers. Enter Veodia. This browser-based video service enables users with a video camera, computer, and broadband connection to broadcast high-quality video over the net. Conference organizers (like businesses) can use Veodia to produce, broadcast, record, and manage high quality video content that can be monetized.

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For years we thought about using video to broadcast the valuable content covered in the conference sessions, but the services available weren't sufficient for our needs. Veodia helped to make EmTech07 a tremendous success.

Veodia, Inc., a browser-based service that enables high-quality video broadcasting, today announced that Office 2.0 and Technology Review's EmTech07 @ MIT, two of the most attended technology conferences in the country, broadcast more than 100 executive presentations, panels, and company demos to a global online audience.

Outfits like Technology Review have long praised the benefits of Web 2.0 technologies to broadcast their conferences, yet the lack of broadband or inferior quality was a primary deterrent, until now. A change is afoot, and conference organizers are waking up to the cost savings and monetization opportunities they can gain.

Veodia enables users with a video camera, computer, and broadband connection to broadcast high-quality video over the net. Conferences and businesses use Veodia to produce, broadcast, record, and manage high quality video content. This content can be viewed live or on-demand, on websites, corporate intranets, blogs, mobile phones, iPods, and TVs.

"The live webcast is a marvelous addition to the conference," said Kathleen Kennedy, senior VP at MIT's Technology Review. "For years we thought about using video to broadcast the valuable content covered in the conference sessions, but the services available weren't sufficient for our needs. Veodia helped to make EmTech07 a tremendous success."

Unlike other video services such as YouTube, Veodia users can create, publish and monetize content while preserving full control and ownership. Technology Review has some of the EmTech sessions available complimentary, but others require $79 payment to view. Thus far, 254 additional Technology Review visitors have registered to view the conference material online. That number is expected to grow as presenting companies look for ways to use their panel content for marketing and sales.

The sessions from the most recent EmTech07 are currently available at https://www.technologyreview.com/emtech/videos/. Kennedy is already looking towards EmTech08 and plans to use Veodia's services again.

Making video content available for live or on-demand viewing has tangible benefits for corporations, too. It gives employees immediate access to valuable content that they can use in presentations, training, sales, or new business opportunities.

"Veodia's contribution was exceptional," raves Ismael Ghalimi, CEO Intalio and Office 2.0 conference organizer. Office 2.0 content was seen both live and on-demand via Veodia's viewing widget, http://www.o2con.com/docs/DOC-1172. "We were also excited to be able to provide our attendees using their iPhones the opportunity to view content provided by Veodia, making this a truly interactive experience." Veodia launched a customized iPhone viewing portal at the Office 2.0 conference.

Users of virtual world environments like Second Life are using Veodia to bridge events between the real and virtual worlds. "I noticed that many in our large educator community were using Veodia to enhance distance learning so I signed up for an account," said John Zdanowski, CFO, Linden Lab. "Setting up a broadcast through Veodia was so easy and fast, we decided to show our EmTech panel discussion to our entire employee base through Second Life."

"We believe in making useful information available to a much wider audience by giving companies and conference organizers the chance to access thought-provoking content, BUT without the high costs," said Guillaume Cohen, CEO, Veodia. "With Veodia, companies not only have a chance to share content live or on-demand online, they can also repurpose the content for their own marketing programs."

About Veodia:
Palo Alto-based Veodia, Inc., enables businesses, universities, and venues the ability to instantly broadcast high quality live video while remotely recording content for immediate on-demand playback. Broadcasters need nothing more than a video camera, computer, and internet connection and content providers retain full control of their content. Veodia replaces in-house digital video publishing solutions that require large budgets, vendor interoperability, and extensive IT support. In April 2007, Veodia joined the WebEx (NASDAQ: WEBX) Connect platform to offer WebEx Connect users an easy way to create and broadcast high quality video.

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Andrea Heuer
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