North Carolina Celebrates Black History

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Revel in the power of African-American art. Come face to face with unique buildings that speak of our past. Savor the work of African-American restaurateurs and chefs. Experience the rich history and heritage of African Americans in North Carolina now and throughout the year.

At the Greensboro Historical Museum, discover American history through the stories of Piedmont people and events in 12 galleries and two restored houses.

Picturing Greensboro: Four Decades of African American Community.

Whether it’s an Underground Railroad historic site, a Civil Rights Movement museum or a fine dining experience brought to you by African-American hands, North Carolina brings together the culture and contributions of African Americans in unique, powerful ways. Create a fresh perspective on today’s breaking news and events by visiting these significant destinations. For a more comprehensive list of African American sites, go to VisitNC.com’s press room http://www.visitnc.com/press_room.asp. The public can call 1-800 VISIT NC (847-4862) for more information.

UNCOVER THE PAST WITH A VIBRANT TODAY: GREENSBORO

  •     Walkway of History, Greensboro

Stroll along South Elm Street as sidewalk markers chronicle six chapters in local African-American history, ranging from the first fugitive slave on the Underground Railroad through the first African-American state Supreme Court Justice. The walkway was unveiled on the 34th anniversary of the Woolworth Civil Rights Sit-ins by the “Greensboro Four.” Click on the link and scroll down for a full-day itinerary!
(336) 373-2043
http://www.visitgreensboro.com/itineraries.cfm#itin11

  •     Hot New Greensboro Book: Otis L. Hairston, Jr. finished a new book in November, 2007. It’s “Picturing Greensboro: Four Decades of African American Community.” Check out his compelling accounts of the sit-ins and more; available on amazon.com.
  •     Simply Simone-The Music of Nina Simone

A UNCG School of Theatre series on February 6, 7 at 7 pm; February 8, 9 at 8 pm; February 10 at 2 pm at the Brown Building Theatre features child prodigy/ jazz superstar and civil rights activist Nina Simone’s work. One of the true divas of the 20th century and a genuine musical powerhouse, Simone’s work defies classification. Come hear for yourself.
(336) 334-4849
http://www.uncg.edu/euc/boxoffice

SAVOR THE FLAVORS OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULINARY TALENT

Sweet Potatoes Restaurant, Winston-Salem
Join owners Vivian Joiner and Stephanie Tyson at their restaurant in the Arts District of Winston Salem. At lunch, soups, salads and sandwiches like Mambo Chicken and V.V.’s Mamma’s Meatloaf are samples of unique Southern-inspired, uptown/down-home cooking. At dinner, enjoy mouthwatering entrées such as Barbecued Duck and Roasted Quail. A full bar and extensive wine list round out any meal. As a finale, try one of Stephanie’s homemade desserts such as Bourbon Pecan Pie or Sweet Potato Cheesecake.
(336) 727-4844
http://www.sweetpotatoes-arestaurant.com

Angus Barn, Raleigh
African-American Executive Chef Walter Royal prepares a wide range of steakhouse specialties. Enjoy fine dining in a rustic atmosphere at this award-winning restaurant, known as “Beefeater’s Haven.” You’ll find a wide variety of cuts aged to perfection in the in-house aging facility that secures ultimate tenderness and flavor. Chef Royal recently battled it out in the kitchen on the hit show “Iron Chef America” on Food Network and won!
(919) 787-3505
http://www.angusbarn.com

ORIGINAL ART FOR THE INSPIRED SOUL

Diggs Gallery, Winston-Salem
Diggs Gallery offers 10 to 15 exhibits each year highlighting the African Diaspora and African-American art and culture. Don’t miss the breathtaking 30-foot-high murals by John Biggers in the O’Kelly Library.
(336) 750-2458
http://www.wssu.edu/WSSU/UndergraduateStudies/College+of+Arts+and+Sciences/Diggs+Gallery/

BRING UNDERSTANDING TO LIFE: PLACES TO EXPLORE AND APPRECIATE

Airlie Gardens - Minnie Evans Sculpture Garden and Bottle Chapel, New Bern
African-American Minnie Evans was the gatekeeper of Airlie Gardens from 1949 to 1974 and is considered to be one of America’s most important visionary artists. The Garden features The Bottle Chapel, metal sculptures, mosaics and ceramic sculptures designed by area artists and completed with the help of volunteers and schoolchildren as a tribute to Minnie’s life and talent.
(910) 798-7700
http://www.airliegardens.org

Afro-American Cultural Center, Charlotte
This multi-disciplinary arts organization preserves the rich artistic heritage of African-American culture through exhibitions, performances, workshops and hands-on activities. A new 44,000-square-foot headquarters is currently being designed and plans to open its doors in 2009.
(704) 374-1565
http://www.aacc-charlotte.org

YMI Cultural Center, Asheville
An Asheville landmark in the heart of downtown, the YMI was first established in 1893 as the Young Men’s Institute. The gallery houses numerous historical exhibits about the African-American community in Western North Carolina and sponsors such cultural events as Asheville’s Goombay! Festival, Annual Kwanzaa Celebration and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday Celebration.
(828) 252-4614
http://www.ymicc.org/

Historic Stagville, Durham
This State Historic Site features 18th and 19th century buildings dedicated to preservation and African-American cultural historic studies. Once among the largest plantation holdings in the South, Stagville’s barn and original slave quarters at Horton Grove provide insights into plantation life, society and culture.
(919) 620-0120
http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/do/stagvill/default.htm

Mendenhall Plantation, Jamestown
This early 19th century Quaker plantation includes many unique outbuildings, a museum and one of two existing false-bottom wagons used to transport runaway slaves during the time of the Underground Railroad. About 5,000 visitors each year enter "The Other South" of 19th century dissenters, see how they lived and learn of their anti-slavery and pacifist views, their respect for education, honesty, plain living and self-reliance.
(336) 454-3819
http://www.mendenhallplantation.org

These are only a few of the many things to see and do for Black History Month in North Carolina. For more options, search on keywords “plantation,” “art,” “church” and “African-American” at VisitNC.com and visit our Press Room for our complete list to celebrate African American culture.

History and heritage come together in North Carolina amidst natural scenic beauty. Come here for adventure and relaxation. Go to VisitNC.com or call 1-800-VISIT NC to plan your next getaway.

Contact:
Susan Dosier, (704) 953-9408 (mobile), sdosier @ visitnc.com
Wit Tuttell, (919) 733-7420 (office), wit @ visitnc.com, media @ visitnc.com

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Wit Tuttell

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