Conservation Law to Help Meet Future Demand, Says Water District

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The Santa Clara Valley Water District today applauded Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Assemblyman John Laird for the new law requiring all new construction in California to use more water-efficient toilets and urinals

In Santa Clara County, conservation efforts have reduced water demand by 10 percent to date and our plans are to more than double this amount by 2030. However, with increasing water demand, spurred by economic and population growth, we must develop and adopt more water efficient technologies.

The Santa Clara Valley Water District today applauded Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Assemblyman John Laird for the new law requiring all new construction in California to use more water-efficient toilets and urinals.

Water conservation is a critical part of the water district’s plan to ensure reliable supply of quality water. We hope this law will help bring more awareness to our conservation programs, which help businesses and residents save water and save money,” said Tony Estremera, Chairman of the Water District Board of Directors.

Among the district-run conservation programs is free high-efficiency toilet installation for businesses in the county. Under the program, apartment complexes, restaurants, food stores, retail and wholesale stores, service stations and other facilities that serve the public can have their old toilets replaced by new high-efficiency toilets.

To homeowners, the district offers cash rebates of up to $125 on high-efficiency and dual-flush toilets and between $100 and $150 on high-efficiency clothes washers. In addition, the district also runs a Water-Wise House Call Program, where a trained technician visits your home and surveys sprinklers, showerheads, toilets etc. to show where water savings can be made. This service is offered at no charge.

The new law, which was signed on Friday, is the first of its kind in the nation and is expected to yield savings of more than eight billion gallons of water by the 10th year of implementation.

Under this law, beginning in 2010, half of all toilets sold in California would need to use high-efficiency toilet technology. By 2014, all toilets sold must meet the new conservation measures.

Director Estremera said, “In Santa Clara County, conservation efforts have reduced water demand by 10 percent to date and our plans are to more than double this amount by 2030. However, with increasing water demand, spurred by economic and population growth, we must develop and adopt more water efficient technologies.”

Water demand in Santa Clara County is expected to rise by 18 percent by the year 2030, driven by a 35 percent population growth. Recognizing that conservation will play an important role in meeting the county’s future water needs, the district runs more than 20 conservation programs.

For more information about the district’s conservation programs, or to reach a team of water-use efficiency experts, call the water district’s water-conservation hotline (408) 265-2607, ext. 2554, or visit our website http://www.valleywater.org.

The Santa Clara Valley Water District manages wholesale drinking water resources and provides stewardship for the county's five watersheds, including 10 reservoirs, more than 800 miles of streams and groundwater basins. The water district also provides flood protection throughout Santa Clara County.

Contact:

Susan Siravo        
Office:    (408) 265-2607, ext. 2290
Mobile: (408)     398-0754

Meenakshi Ganjoo    
(408) 265-2607, ext. 2295        
(408) 205-3064

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Susan Siravo

Meenakshi Ganjoo

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