How to Save Money on Live Christmas Trees: 4 Savings Tips from GoBankingRates.com Report

Leading personal finance resource, GoBankingRates.com, investigates the cost of live Christmas trees, and discovers four ways holiday shoppers can save on their purchase of a real tree for their home this season.

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Save Money on Live Christmas Trees

Save Money on Live Christmas Trees

Trees that grow faster are less expensive because they can be brought to market faster. Shoppers looking for a cheaper Christmas tree should ask to see species like Balsam and Douglas first.

EL SEGUNDO, CA (PRWEB) December 21, 2012

The price of buying a new, real Christmas tree year over year can add up, spreading tight holiday budgets even thinner. To help consumers save, http://www.GoBankingRates.com investigated four key ways to save money when purchasing a live Christmas tree.

A December 2012 Nielsen Survey from the American Christmas Tree Association (ACTA) found the average cost of an artificial tree to be $80, while the average cost of a live Christmas tree to be $45. However, many tree varieties can edge up to over $100, depending on the size and species. Comparing these price points, using an artificial tree for even just two years would provide savings of at least $10 over buying a real Christmas tree every year.

In an exclusive interview with Michael Bondi, professor of forestry and regional administrator with Oregon State University Extension Services, GoBankingRates.com asked for his expert advice on how shoppers can get a deal on a live Christmas tree and keep more money in their savings accounts.

“Trees that grow faster are less expensive because they can be brought to market faster,” Bondi said. "Shoppers looking for a cheaper Christmas tree should ask to see species like Balsam and Douglas first.”

Shopping around is one of the best ways to find a good deal, and it can also help shoppers find a tree that is fresh, healthy, and the size and look they desire. Local garden centers offer the freshest stock of live Christmas trees, and local nonprofits often sell cheap Christmas trees for a good cause. “The money you spend on a Christmas tree is an investment in the economy and the environment,” Bondi said. He adds that buying live Christmas trees provides jobs for American farmers and their employees.

To view the full savings report, please click here.

About Go Banking Rates

http://www.GoBankingRates.co m is a national website dedicated to connecting readers with the best interest rates on financial services nationwide, as well as informative personal finance content, news and tools. GoBankingRates.com collects interest rate information from more than 4,000 U.S. banks and credit unions, making it the only online rates aggregator with the ability to provide the most comprehensive and authentic local interest rate information.

Additionally, GoBankingRates.com partners with a number of major media outlets such as Business Insider and US News & World Report to provide compelling and edifying personal finance content, and its expert editors have been featured and quoted on several premier finance websites like Yahoo! Finance, Forbes, The Street, Huffington Post and more.

GoBankingRates.com belongs to a network of more than 1500 finance websites, including GoInsuranceRates.com and GoFreeCredit.com. These sites receive more than 2 million visits each month.

For questions or comments, please contact:

Jaime Catmull, Director of Public Relations
GoBankingRates.com
JaimeC(@)GoBankingRates(dot)com
310.297.9233 x261

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Holiday Savings You Can Buy a Real Christmas Tree Without Spending 60 or More Holiday Savings You Can Buy a Real Christmas Tree Without Spending 60 or More

Holiday Savings You Can Buy a Real Christmas Tree Without Spending 60 or More


GoBankingRates.com GoBankingRates.com

GoBankingRates.com


Michael Bondi, Professor of Forestry, Oregon State University Michael Bondi, Professor of Forestry, Oregon State University

Michael Bondi, Professor of Forestry, Oregon State University