World-Wide-Art.com to Feature ‘Beneath the Cottonwoods’ by Z.S. Liang

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World-Wide-Art.com, a widely respected custom conservation framing company and art gallery, has announced the availability of Z.S. Liang’s latest piece, titled “Beneath the Cottonwoods.”

Beneath the Cottonwoods - Z.S. Liang - World-Wide-Art.com

Beneath the Cottonwoods - Z.S. Liang - World-Wide-Art.com

When looking at this piece, it becomes obvious that Liang was inspired greatly by his field work with tribes, particularly their customs. He really leaves out no detail, while still capturing the emotion of the scene.

World-Wide-Art.com, a widely respected custom conservation framing company and art gallery, has announced the availability of Z.S. Liang’s latest piece, titled “Beneath the Cottonwoods.”    

The painting depicts the maternal love of an American Indian woman with her young daughter and infant son. It features bright, realistic colors and intricate details, providing the viewer with an incredible visual experience of Native American life.

“We are very pleased to offer this outstanding work by Liang at World-Wide-Art.com,” said David Wilfong, spokesperson for World Wide Art, Inc. “This is one artist who never fails to disappoint with his original works, and we are very fortunate to carry it at our online store.”

Z.S. Liang is commonly regarded as one of the world’s most prolific artists, with museums and collectors often buying his latest original works before anyone else even has the chance to see them. Born in China, he gets much of his inspiration from life in the United States, particularly from his studies of the Wampanoag Indian culture. Liang holds a Masters of Fine Arts degree from Boston University, and has made a number of connections and bonds through his field research of Native American tribes all across the country.

“Beneath the Cottonwoods” reflects the common tradition of Blackfoot tribe girls, who married young and looked forward to becoming mothers. In the piece, the mother carries her baby in a cradleboard, which was common among Native American tribes to protect and carry young ones. Looking more closely at the cradle, one can see a beaded umbilical cord amulet hanging off to the left. The snake shape of the amulet tells us that the child is a boy.

The cradleboard also features a carrying strap slung over the mother’s shoulders and chest, allowing for easier movement and for the baby to see what is going on around him. Mothers also often used this strap to momentarily hang the cradleboard from a tree or saddle pummel while they completed important tasks.

“This painting really gives us some beautiful insight into the daily routines and magic that surrounds life in Native American tribes all over the United States,” said Wilfong. “When looking at this piece, it becomes obvious that Liang was inspired greatly by his field work with tribes, particularly their customs. He really leaves out no detail, while still capturing the emotion of the scene.”

In addition to Liang’s “Beneath the Cottonwoods” painting, World Wide Art offers numerous other esteemed new releases, limited editions and honored collections by today's top artists. For more information, visit http://www.world-wide-art.com.

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David Wilfong
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