Kids Love Speaking Spanish With Upbeat Learning Materials From Sing-A-Lingo

Share Article

New Spanish-All-Day Program from Sing-A-Lingo helps kids naturally use Spanish...All Day

Sing-A-lingo Logo

From the catchy lyrics to the lively and upbeat tunes this is far more than a language lesson on a disc...parents told us that this quickly took over top position on the playlist zooming to the top of the family charts, with a bullet! (from TNPC award)

Lingo, an educational company that provides resources for teaching children a new language, is launching its new Spanish-All-Day: En Mi Casa Program. This unique program combines Spanish songs for kids, visual aids and interactive, online fun to create effortless, language learning moments. It also gives children and caregivers the opportunity to spend joyful, wholesome time together, deepening connections and promoting life-long learning.

The Spanish-All-Day Program builds on Sing-A-Lingo’s first album, En Mi Casa (In My House). Research shows that immersion is the best approach for teaching a new language, so En Mi Casa features catchy, Spanish-only lyrics to provide families with Spanish support for a typical day. The original songs featured on the album are about practical, functional topics in environments where children already find themselves, so practicing Spanish just happens. The language taught through the songs is suitable for preschool Spanish classes, homeschool settings, and learning at home.

The En Mi Casa album is the recent recipient of a Parent’s Choice Award, 2009 iParenting Media Award and The National Parenting Center (TNPC) Seal of Approval, whose testers fell "in love with the music. From the catchy lyrics to the lively and upbeat tunes this is far more than a language lesson on a disc."

How It Works—Morning, Noon and Night

The Sing-A-Lingo approach promotes growth and learning through joyful music that accompanies everyday activities and creates family fun. The En Mi Casa Album is the heart of the Spanish-All-Day Program and includes songs that can turn almost any moment into a fun Spanish language activity. Start the day with “En la Mañana," a song about the morning routine. Singing about putting on their “camisa y pantalones" will have kids excited about getting dressed for the day.

The Say’NStick™ Word Notes include 60 colorful, fun and educational repositionable notes to label household items, keeping useful words front and center in “la casa”. See 'em, Say 'em and watch the learning Stick! The notes help send the kids to "la mesa" for breakfast, and to "el refrigerador” for milk.

The laminated Lyric’NLanguage™ To-Go Cards keep Spanish/English lyrics and extensive related vocabulary on hand all the time. While listening to the CD, at home or in the car, children and caregivers can read along or explore the back of the corresponding card to find new words, activity ideas and tips that are relevant to the song’s topic.

As an afternoon activity, caregivers can log onto http://www.singalingo.com for free online activities. Children can play the Keys to the Treasure Video Game which features Spanish audio and visuals that reinforce the same words taught in the songs. Also, dance along with music videos to help associate specific gestures with word meanings--a proven way to teach kids Spanish.

Finally, the Buenas Noches, Amigos Singable Book is a perfect end to the day, creating a Spanish bedtime routine. This colorful picture book follows a youngster, his cat and an adventurous mouse on a journey from bathtub bubbles to sweet dreams. It is easy to read or sing along as the song lyrics provide the book's text. In addition, emerging readers will find themselves easily reading in Spanish, and the English translation is provide.

The Sing-A-Lingo Story

Piña Madera, founder of Sing-A-Lingo, was brought up in a bilingual family. Her mother was born in Mexico and made sure that Piña became well-versed in the Spanish language and celebrated her Latino heritage. Throughout her childhood, Piña studied classical piano and went on to study writing at Brown University. When she married Michael Madera, who had a Master's degree in Spanish and had also studied music, they were destined to start Sing-A-Lingo.

As bilingual parents, Piña and Michael wanted to preserve the Spanish language while giving their own kids the multiple benefits of speaking a second language. When the Maderas set out to raise their children to be bilingual, they began looking for materials. Piña and Michael tried a variety of available learning aids including music, movies and books. While some were helpful, they had trouble finding enjoyable products that integrated useful Spanish into daily life.

Piña and Michael found that most home-based Spanish teaching materials pinpoint simple nouns or colors, presenting limited communicative language. Others simply translated traditional songs, like "Old McDonald." Determining that "cow" had limited uses in their daily life, Piña and Michael were more interested in teaching language like "I'm hungry," or "Wash your hands." And as musicians themselves, they also wanted to provide music-based materials that offered quality melodies and lyrics for parents and children to enjoy as a fun family activity. Frustrated with the options available, Piña and Michael developed Sing-A-Lingo to address their own needs and to help others in similar situations. This new comprehensive program from Sing-A-Lingo helps caregivers and educators around the world more effectively and enjoyably teach children Spanish.

About Sing-A-Lingo

Sing-A-Lingo is an educational company that supports caregivers and educators in their efforts to teach young children a new language. Using a well-respected method that teaches language and movement, Sing-A-Lingo makes fun and useful teaching tools that are easily incorporated into typical childhood activities. Headquartered in Medford, Mass., Sing-A-Lingo is a woman-owned, privately-held company. For more information or to purchase products, please visit http://www.singalingo.com or call 617-852-9687.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Mikala Vidal
Visit website