School Teachers and Principals use National Punctuation Day for Day-Long Learning

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School children learn punctuation skills through games and songs, send essays and videos on what they learned to Punctuation Man.

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You have wrapped up the best in teaching to bring to our students. I love the fact that you are not afraid to teach young children great skills!

When National Punctuation Day (NPD) was observed on September 24 in classrooms across the country, teachers and principals seized the opportunity to teach punctuation skills to their school children.

No better example can be found than at Auburn Elementary School in Auburn, Michigan, where Principal Mary Goedert and her teachers took advantage of NPD as a vehicle for teaching important literacy skills.

Students coming to school that morning were greeted with a chorus of fourth graders singing the Punctuation Rap over the school's loudspeaker. During the day, Julee Dillon's fourth-grade students played Punctuation Football, and Carol Plaush's second-grade students and Melissa Ramirez's third-grade students played sentence games in which students dressed in vests with punctuation marks on them punctuated sentences.

Media Specialist Pam Simon planned punctuation games, complete with costumes. Not to be outdone, second-grade students of Cindy Berg and fourth-grade students of Karen Rauschenberger wrote short essays on "What I Learned on National Punctuation Day." Their precious and precocious comments are available on the NPD web site.

One student wrote: "I learned new punctuation like colons. Also I learned that punctuation is important because if we didn't have punctuation we would be talking and reading forever. I learned a new song. Me and my classmates sang the song on Punctuation Day. I love punctuation."

Another wrote: "I learned so much we read about all sorts about exclamation marks, quotation, commas and colons and a song can't forget the song Punk Punk Punctuation. Man that was a cool song it was in rock and jazz. I liked jazz the most. I played punctuation games like we took out all punctuation out and someone had to put them back."

To find out more about this year's exciting NPD festivities at Auburn Elementary, visit the NPD website to:.

Read more student essays
See photos of the children's NPD activities
Watch and listen to students perform the Punctuation Rap for the entire school
Watch a video to learn more about Punctuation Playtime

"The enthusiastic response of students to the innovative programs teachers design around National Punctuation Day shows that children are eager to learn basic language skills when presented in an exciting way," says Jeff Rubin, founder of National Punctuation Day."

Jeff and his wife, Norma, wrote an assembly program -- Punctuation Playtime -- which they perform in elementary schools around the United States. Teachers love the program and how Jeff and Norma interact with the children.

"Your program completely supports our curriculum content," said Sally Feldman, a teacher at Washington Elementary School, in Point Richmond, CA. "You have wrapped up the best in teaching to bring to our students. I love the fact that you are not afraid to teach young children great skills!"

Punctuation Playtime is also offered to teachers, schools and school districts as an instructional DVD, so the program can be replicated in individual classrooms and assemblies. Teachers may share the DVD, so classes in several grades in one school will be able to benefit from the learning.

Rubin, a former newspaperman, founded NPD in 2004. NPD is listed in Chase's Calendar of Events and The Teacher's Calendar, two directories published by McGraw-Hill. NPD is widely recognized by the Fortune 500 and educators everywhere, and is widely covered by media in the United States and internationally.

Jeff Rubin, a member of the National Speakers Association and speaks frequently on writing, marketing, and integrity for small-business owners, is ready to tell anyone how he and his wife have energized thousands of children on a subject routinely regarded as boring and duller than dirt.

To learn how schools or companies can participate in National Punctuation Day, or to schedule an interview with Punctuation Man, call Jeff at (877) 588-1212 or e-mail him at jeff @ NationalPunctuationDay.com.

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