Montana Interior Design Firm Kibler & Kirch Reveals Five Tips for Small-but-mighty Kitchen Design

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Jeremiah Young, principal designer for Montana interior design firm Kibler & Kirch understands that even the smallest kitchens can provide maximum style and function. Three Kibler & Kirch-designed tiny kitchens illustrate Young’s tips for getting big results from small spaces.

Heartland’s modern kitchen appliances add vintage form without sacrificing function in the Kibler & Kirch studio kitchen, sometimes called on to cater events for neighboring Stapleton Gallery.

Creating a small kitchen with high function and style takes a curator’s eye and minimalist’s honesty.

Square footage doesn’t always define the best kitchens. In fact, Jeremiah Young, owner and principal designer for venerable Western interior design house Kibler & Kirch, located in Billings and Red Lodge, Montana, cherishes the challenge of creating stylish and functional small kitchens. “Small kitchens have their virtues,” says Young. “When well-designed they can be masters of step-saving efficiency. The art of the small kitchen is to design it no larger than it needs to be in order to be functional for the user.”

Applying timeless touches combined with keen attention to utility, he’s cultivated a portfolio of clever solutions for what’s arguably the most important room in any house. In his own home, a foursquare Montana farmhouse with classic vintage and antique influences and boasting just 3,200 square feet for his active family of five, Young’s kitchen decisions focused on flexibility and accessible spaces. For instance, he sacrificed a formal dining room for a space-saving eat-in kitchen, letting a long harvest table double as central work space for cooking, dining and even homework for the kids.

In Kibler & Kirch’s Billings design studio a tiny kitchen is the staging ground for refreshments that supply both catered events and small business meetings. The windowless space was expertly maximized with small, retro-style appliances and a mini movable kitchen butcher block island. In the spirit of an elegant butler’s pantry and what Young describes as an old-fashioned notion of functionality, open shelving replaces elaborate upper cabinetry while original art adds refinement. Young honored the 1904-era of the historic Stapleton building by using honest materials that aren’t meant to be showcased, but truly utilized.

In a small urban loft project in another vintage downtown Billings commercial building, Young’s team acknowledged a client’s modest budget, creating an open concept galley kitchen. With ample workspace and basic appliances, the kitchen offers a sleek solution to modern living.

Whether for cottage living, a guest house or tight apartment, creating a small kitchen with high function and style takes a curator’s eye and minimalist’s honesty. Young suggests these five quick tips for the tiny kitchen to help guide the process:

  • Use drawers not doors.
  • Include original art.
  • Choose versatile workspaces.
  • Lighting can make or break the room.
  • Don’t be afraid to consult a professional designer to customize a small space.

About Jeremiah Young’s Kibler & Kirch:
Annually recognized on Mountain Living magazine’s Top Mountain Designers list, Kibler & Kirch resonates with a distinctive – and distinctly Western – style through the various branches of the business. Its Billings showroom represents more than 100 companies – a carefully curated collection of furnishings and décor ranging from rustic to refined. And the talented design staff brings those resources – and deep connections with regional artists and artisans – to bear on crafting interiors for clients who range from young professionals and just-marrieds to second-home owners creating luxurious turn-key Rocky Mountain dream home projects. Always, Young and his Kibler & Kirch team create comfortably tasteful living where the spirit of the West meets modern treasures that are built to last. For more information, visit http://www.kiblerandkirch.com.

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