Landmark Cash Releases Fascinating Infographic That Shows the Evolution of the $100 Dollar Bill

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The Release of the Educational Infographic Ties in with the Launch of the Latest Version of the Note.

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Furthermore, the new $100 also features raised printing, microprinting, and a complete, cosmetic redesign that effectively couples aesthetics with high-security assurance.

Landmark Cash has just released an educational and fascinating infographic that shows in a series of photos just how much the $100 dollar bill has changed over the last 150 years. The launch of the infographic, which is titled “Evolution of the $100 Bill,” could not be any more timely; on October 8, a new version of the bill was released that includes advanced security features that are meant to help stop counterfeiting.

As the infographic noted, the new features in the updated “Ben Franklin” include a blue security ribbon that is made up of hundreds of thousands of microlenses that can help to determine the bill’s authenticity, as well as a copper-colored inkwell. Inside the inkwell there is a picture of the Liberty Bell, which will change color from copper to green, depending on which way the note is held.

“Furthermore, the new $100 also features raised printing, microprinting, and a complete, cosmetic redesign that effectively couples aesthetics with high-security assurance,” the infographic explained.

For anybody who is fascinated by money, the new infographic offers an outstanding look at how the $100 dollar bill has changed dramatically over time—both in appearance and size. The infographic includes both front and reverse sides of each bill, along with a timeline of corresponding dates.

For example, the first bill that is pictured is from 1862. During the Civil War, both the North and South issued money that was not backed by silver or gold, in order to help fund the war. The bill that is featured is known as a “Greenback,” and was issued by the North. Rather than featuring Ben Franklin on the front, the bill includes a picture of a soaring eagle.

The $100 dollar bills from 1878 and 1880 already began to look different; the image of the eagle was no longer used, and instead President Abraham Lincoln was on the front.

By 1929, the size of paper currency in the United States got smaller—going from 190 by 80 mm to 156 by 66 mm. This size is still in use today. Around that time, currency also began to feature a more standardized look. Every variation of the $100 dollar bill from this time forward would feature Benjamin Franklin on the front, and Independence Hall on the reverse.

About Landmark Cash:

Landmark Cash in a financial resource that provides a lender-matching service. Landmark Cash is not a lender and does not broker loans. For more information, please visit http://www.landmarkcash.com/.

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