New Retail Clinic Survey Finds Visitors Are Mostly Adults, Among Other Findings

A new Kalorama Information survey of retail clinic visitors may shed light on the use of these small medical practices within drugstores or grocery stores, in the wake of concerns expressed by the nation’s leading pediatric physician association.

New York, NY (PRWEB) April 29, 2014

A new Kalorama Information survey of retail clinic visitors may shed light on the use of these small medical practices within drugstores or grocery stores, in the wake of concerns expressed by the nation’s leading pediatric physician association. The healthcare market research publisher said their survey of US consumers who had visited a retail clinic revealed most retail clinic visitors are mostly adults who have a regular physician, and most visits are for low-level care. In its report, “Retail Clinics Market Overview and 2014 Survey Results,” Kalorama said that 66% of retail clinic visitors are adults who are not accompanied by a child.    

“Our survey found that retail clinics are mostly adult zones, used by non-parents, along with a substantial number of parents using clinic without their children,” said Bruce Carlson, Publisher of Kalorama Information.

Retail clinics are medical settings located in a retail store. They are not free standing and do not offer all services. Most of these clinic locations are located either in CVS, Walgreens, Target or Walmart Stores, but there are other chains and venues as well. Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a policy statement about the use of such clinics. (http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/133/3/e794) The association said that retail clinics lead to “fragmented care, incomplete health records and a possible decrease in the quality of care.”

Kalorama’s survey found that while 51% of retail clinic visitors have children, only 36% of visitors have brought a child to a retail clinic. Further just more than a quarter, or 27% of retail clinic visitors brought a child 11 years of age or younger. Kalorama Information conducted an online panel of 2,000 U.S. adults, age 18 and over adjusted for US population. The panel was conducted from Jan 23 to February 26, 2014. The survey respondents were queried on a variety of topics, including retail clinic usage, the reason for their visits and satisfaction.

Kalorama said the most common reason for a visit to a retail clinic is for a cold, or to get a vaccination. While this may indicate the threat to business is not serious, it may not be of comfort to pediatricians. The AAP noted in their warning that even pediatric visits for minor conditions are important to assess if larger problems may exist or notice trends. Kalorama found that most retail clinic visitors do have a regular physician – 84% have a physician that they have seen in the last year, and that this number is up 3% from the firm’s survey in 2013.

“Our survey doesn’t counter concerns that there might be a lack of opportunity to see patients for a low-level visit and detect problems of a higher level,” said Carlson. “But we did find that most retail clinic visitors aren’t yet giving up on their physician. There’s the possibility that retail clinic care visits may be in addition to rather than instead of standard care visits.”

The report, “Retail Clinics Market Overview and 2014 Survey Results,” confirms some expectations about retail clinics, but also confounds some of the common assertions about retail clinic customers, and provides a basis for industry-watchers to conduct business planning and develop a strategic marketing plan. The report can be found at: http://www.kaloramainformation.com/Retail-Clinics-Overview-8071114/.

About Kalorama Information

Kalorama Information, a division of MarketResearch.com, supplies the latest in independent medical market research in diagnostics, biotech, pharmaceuticals, medical devices and healthcare; as well as a full range of custom research services. We routinely assist the media with healthcare topics. Follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and our blog at http://www.kaloramainformation.com.


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