Yourwellness Magazine Explores Gallstones Treatments

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With an Olympic boxing bronze medalist undergoing surgery to remove gallstones, Yourwellness Magazine gave readers an overview of gallstones and how they are treated.

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London 2012 Olympic boxing bronze medallist M.C. Mary Kom has recently undergone gallbladder surgery to remove gallstones, Sportskeeda reported September 11th. According to the article, “Olympic bronze medallist boxer MC Mary Kom undergoes gallbladder surgery,” the five-time world champion from India had the 26 gallstones and gallbladder removed at the Imphal-based Shija Hospitals and Research Institute, after complaining of severe pain in the upper abdomen. Nonetheless, Kom is still determined to compete in the 2016 Rio Olympics. (http://www.sportskeeda.com/2013/09/11/olympic-bronze-medallist-boxer-mc-mary-kom-undergoes-gallbladder-surgery/)

With this in mind, Yourwellness Magazine took a closer look at gallstones. Yourwellness Magazine explained, ‘Gallstones are small stones, usually made of cholesterol, that form in the gallbladder. In most cases they do not cause any symptoms. However, if a gallstone becomes trapped in a duct (opening) inside the gallbladder it can trigger a sudden intense abdominal pain that usually lasts between one and five hours. This type of abdominal pain is known as biliary colic. The medical term for symptoms and complications related to gallstones is gallstone disease or cholelithiasis. Gallstone disease can also cause inflammation of the gallbladder (cholecystitis). This can cause persistent pain, jaundice and a high temperature (fever) of 38°C (100.4°F) or above.” (http://www.yourwellness.com/2013/07/introduction-64/#sthash.Y5Z32mgM.dpuf)

Yourwellness Magazine noted that gallstone disease is relatively straightforward to treat, the most widely used treatment being keyhole surgery to remove the gallbladder, which is generally safe with a low risk of complications. Yourwellness Magazine commented that there are several non-surgical treatments that can be used to break up gallstones, but as the stones often return at a later date, surgery is usually the preferred option where possible. Yourwellness Magazine clarified that a person can lead a perfectly normal life without a gallbladder. The organ can be useful but it is not essential as the liver will still produce bile to digest food.

To find out more, visit the gateway to living well at http://www.yourwellness.com.

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Michael Kitt
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