Misconception: HPV Virus Is Cleared From the Body

A new article published in 2013 in John’s Hopkins Public Health Magazine said that “studies reveal that latent but undetectable HPV is reactivating (1)” in study cohorts. The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) argues that HPV can be dangerous while latent.

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If the accepted HPV story is accurate, that it’s acquired during sexual debut and clears within two years, then the prevalence of HPV ...should not be associated with individuals’ cumulative lifetime sexual behavior. - Dr. Gravitt, Perdana University

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) October 03, 2013

Large numbers of women who have been in a long-term, monogamous relationship are showing up with HPV symptoms. This means their HPV infection cannot be new. Since they had undetectable levels of HPV over many years, the only possible source of the HPV symptoms is a reactivation of a virus that was latent for many years (1).

Researchers are surprised by this observation because it contradicts the accepted belief that HPV is usually cleared within two years after infection. Dr. Anne Rositch said “Increasingly, clinicians are confronting middle-aged patients in long, monogamous marriages who, oddly enough, have acquired 'new' HPV infections (1).”

Researchers suggested that “Menopause and aging may be vulnerable times, immunologically speaking, during which the probability of reactivation is increased (1).” Dr. Patti Gravitt agrees. “If the accepted HPV story is accurate - that it’s acquired during sexual debut and clears within two years, then the prevalence of HPV infection in populations should not be associated with individuals’ cumulative lifetime sexual behavior (1).” In contrast, what researchers are finding is that HPV infection is almost certainly associated with the number of lifetime sexual partners a person has.

Speaking of latent HPV infections, Dr. Gravitt continued by saying “if menopause, or just getting old, increases HPV reactivation, then we need to look at what this means for screening these older women who came of age during the sexual revolution and are much more likely to reach menopause with latent HPV (1).”

What does it mean that so many women have a latent HPV infection? There is a misconception that a latent infection is harmless. According to Dr. Hanan Polansky’s Theory of Microcompetition with Foreign DNA, this is not true.

Viruses can cause disease while still latent, that is, without being reactivated. Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed book, “Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease,” explains how latent viruses can cause many major diseases.

Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.

To learn more about the Theory of Microcompetition with Foreign DNA visit: http://www.cbcd.net

For more information on the Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease, or to schedule an interview with one of our researchers, please visit http://www.cbcd.net or call 585-250-9999.

References:

(1)    http://magazine.jhsph.edu/2013/spring/features/the-virus-that-owns-the-world/page-2/
(2)    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3330195/

The CBCD is a research center recognized by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) non-for-profit organization. The mission of the CBCD is to advance the research on the biology of chronic diseases, and to accelerate the discovery of treatments.

The CBCD published the “Purple” book by Dr. Hanan Polansky. The book presents Dr. Polansky’s highly acclaimed scientific theory on the relationship between foreign DNA and the onset of chronic diseases. Dr. Polansky’s book is available as a free download from the CBCD website.


Contact

  • Hanan Polansky
    Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD)
    +1 (585) 250-9999
    Email