Shower Doctor: Bad manners to use a mobile in the bathroom?

Survey Reveals Etiquette Disappears Out of the ‘Bathroom’ Window

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With mobile phone usage becoming a mainstream lifestyle, it doesn’t come as a surprise that society doesn’t give a second thought to breaking what many see as conventional norms.

(PRWEB UK) 3 October 2013

It’s a well-known fact that mobile phones and manners together make for bad etiquette, and this statistic has since been proven from a survey reporting that a staggering 59 per cent of respondents have no problem using their smartphones whilst in the bathroom.

A report published in news.com.au noted the results of a survey undertaken by market research consultancy firm, iGR, where the mobile phone behaviour of 1000 participants was closely monitored. The study found that while in the bathroom, 43 per cent of smartphone users sent or received text messages, 22 per cent made or received a call while 21 per cent sent or received emails.

A spokesperson from the Shower Doctor said: “Attitudes towards technology is relaxing, and with social media a ubiquitous force, many people feel the need to be a part of it at all times – regardless of the location.

“With mobile phone usage becoming a mainstream lifestyle, it doesn’t come as a surprise that society doesn’t give a second thought to breaking what many see as conventional norms; with online identities now becoming a permanent fixture in our everyday lives.”

The results also found that 20 per cent of respondents played games on their phone behind bathroom doors, 10 per cent listened to music while 6 per cent admitted to partaking in other activities with their phone.

Females were 10 per cent more likely to have placed voice calls as well as send or receive texts, whereas men were more likely to have used email messaging.

The study also uncovered a generational theme in the bathroom – with those aged over 45 being 45 to 55 per cent less likely to have ever brought their phone to the bathroom while 18 to 24 year olds were 60 per cent more likely to send text messages in the bathroom.

“This survey shows some disturbing trends and that no location is off-limits to mobile phone users,” stated Iain Gillott, founder and president of iGR.

“Anyone who has visited an airport bathroom recently knows just how many people are talking, texting and emailing. The survey data shows that younger generations are more at fault and that over time, it is likely that more and more mobile communication will take place in the bathroom.”

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