LULAC Receives Diversity Advocate Award at 30th Annual Kaitz Foundation Dinner

Share Article

The League of United Latin American Citizens, the nation’s oldest and largest Latino civil rights organization in the country, will be honored as the 2013 Diversity Advocate at the 30th Annual Walter Kaitz Foundation Fundraising Dinner.

We are proud to be recognized as the 2013 Diversity Advocate. This award is an acknowledgement of LULAC’s broad range of programs designed to empower the Hispanic community.

Today, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the nation’s oldest and largest Latino civil rights organization in the country, will be honored as the 2013 Diversity Advocate at the 30th Annual Walter Kaitz Foundation Fundraising Dinner.

The Diversity Advocate award is presented annually to an organization outside of the cable industry that has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to diversity. Through visionary leadership, LULAC has fostered a more embracing and inclusive diversity environment for the cable industry.

“We are proud to be recognized as the 2013 Diversity Advocate,” stated LULAC National Executive Director Brent Wilkes. “This award is an acknowledgement of LULAC’s broad range of programs designed to empower the Hispanic community. We are also grateful for our partnerships with AT&T, Cox Enterprises, Time Warner Cable, P&G, Comcast/NBC Universal, Broadband for America, and Redemtech. Those partnerships help to strengthen our programs and technology centers throughout the country.”

Founded in 1929, LULAC engages a network of 135,000 community volunteers, 1000+ local councils, 60 community technology centers and 13 LULAC National Educational Service Centers in order to empower Latino communities across the country.

As the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization, LULAC has developed a broad range of programs designed to empower the Hispanic community. Some of LULAC’s programs include:

  •     LULAC’s Empower Hispanic America with Technology Initiative: This network of 60 community technology centers provides free broadband access and computer-related training to students, parents, and low-income individuals. The program helps individuals to do school work, conduct college and financial aid searches, job searches, and advise on managing money, English language courses, and citizenship preparation courses are also available. The program provides services to over 150,000 people each year.
  •     LULAC Education Advocacy Program, Promoting High School Success: The LULAC national office works with local LULAC councils to host Education Reform & Advocacy seminars throughout the United States. The expertise gained from the training sessions builds the knowledge base in order to better for access to equitable education at the local, state, and federal levels. LULAC’s education policy team also leads education reform initiatives in Washington, D.C. and co-chairs the Hispanic Education Coalition.
  •     LULAC’s Latinos Living Healthy Initiative: The initiative engages LULAC's network of 135,000 community volunteers,1000+ local councils and 60 community technology centers in a series of health and wellness public education campaigns, issued-based advocacy trainings, health education programs and community health festivals. LULAC also conducts community health briefings and public health education programs that focus on addressing the health disparities that lead to the onset of chronic disease.
  •     LULAC Leadership Initiative: This project revitalizes Hispanic neighborhoods from within by creating a nationwide network of innovative grassroots service programs in 1000+ Hispanic communities which are served by LULAC Councils. The project identifies best practices, publishes a model program guide, and provides organization and training through regional offices.

Each year, the Kaitz Foundation dinner typically raises more than $1 million to fund diversity-oriented programs and initiatives for three industry-based diversity organizations: the Emma L. Bowen Foundation; the National Association for Multi-ethnicity in Communications (NAMIC); and Women in Cable Telecommunications (WICT).

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Paloma Zuleta
LULAC
202-812-4477
Email >
Follow us on
Visit website