Yourwellness Magazine Takes Closer Look at Child Eating Disorders

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Following the announcement that some people with eating disorders are waiting for more than a year to get specialist treatment, Yourwellness Magazine felt compelled to explore child eating disorders.

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The Charity Beat has announced that some people with eating disorders are having to wait for more than a year to get specialist treatment, BBC News reported October 7th. According to the article, “Eating disorder patients 'waiting too long' for treatment,” it is a requirement that patients with a physical illness are given treatment within 18 weeks of being referred by their GP, but there is currently no time limit for those who are mentally ill. The BBC noted the comments of government, which insists it wants mental health patients, including those with eating disorders, to be treated equally to patients with physical problems, and so plans to introduce timelines next year. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-24425924)

With this in mind, Yourwellness Magazine felt compelled to explore child eating disorders. Yourwellness Magazine noted that incidences of child and teenage eating disorders have risen in recent decades. Yourwellness Magazine explained, “Many factors have contributed to the trend including the much-publicised detrimental effect of airbrushed magazine models and “size 0” culture. Playground bullying has always been an issue associated with many childhood problems and is likely to continue however much we try to dissuade it.” (http://www.yourwellness.com/2011/09/fussy-eater-or-eating-disorder/)

Yourwellness Magazine commented that a surprising contributing factor to child eating disorders has been the initiative of Personal, Health, Social and Economic Education classes (PHSE). According to Yourwellness Magazine, many primary schools have been encouraged to ‘screen’ children at the ages of four and 10, to determine whether they are overweight. These children’s parents then receive a letter, which may cause children to feel self-conscious of their weight, and take the anti-obesity advice given in PHSE classes to extremes. Yourwellness Magazine advised parents to look out for symptoms of an eating disorder, such as sudden changes in diet or exercise.

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Michael Kitt
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