President of IHMF Respond to Study by the DoD on HBOT in TBI/PTSD

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is a 350-year-old treatment that uses increased pressure and oxygen to heal wounds in the body in any location and of any duration. The Department of Defense (DoD) and DoD-associated researchers announced the results of the second and third of their four studies on HBOT for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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New Orleans, LA (PRWEB) October 18, 2013

The Department of Defense (DoD) and DoD-associated researchers announced the results of the second and third of their four studies on hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite flawed designs and erroneous conclusions, the data from the first study by Wolf, et al (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/neu.2012.2549), and now the second by Cifu, et al (http://www.researchgate.net/publication/256837672_The_Effect_of_Hyperbaric_Oxygen_on_Persistent_Postconcussion_Symptoms), have re-affirmed the effectiveness of HBOT in TBI and PTSD by showing the benefits of new doses of HBOT in TBI. Simultaneously, the data demonstrated doses of HBOT that are ineffective and even harmful. The conclusions of these articles claiming no benefit from the HBOT treatment contradict their data.

The data from the first DoD study by Wolf, et al in 2012 reaffirmed the positive results previously obtained by Harch and colleagues in 2011 which resulted from the traditional neurological dose of HBOT (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/neu.2011.1895). Using two different doses of HBOT, Wolf and colleagues demonstrated significant improvement in symptoms of TBI and PTSD in U.S. military Veterans who had suffered traumatic brain injuries months to years before. Using three additional doses of HBOT the Cifu study data reaffirmed the effectiveness of HBOT in PTSD with one dose and showed the ineffectiveness of the other two doses for both TBI and PTSD.

More recently in a scientific forum on 6/15/2013 the DoD presented positive data from a third study performed at the traditional doses used by Neubauer, Harch and others. Collectively, all of the DoD and civilian studies demonstrated improvements in chronic TBI and PTSD which are comparatively effective to or exceed the results of all other therapies in current use for these conditions. More Importantly, the benefits were generated safely with minimal side effects. In contrast, the current DOD standard of care for TBI and PTSD includes psychoactive drugs which have been implicated in the increased suicide rate in Veterans.

HBOT is a 350 year old therapy that uses increased pressure and oxygen to heal wounds in the body in any location and of any duration. Traditionally applied to divers, diabetic patients with foot wounds, and radiation wounds HBOT continues to produce effective results in the treatment of both acute and chronic TBI as well as PTSD.

The current results of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for brain injured Veterans represent hope where no hope has existed and the possibility of permanent recovery. "This therapy should be offered to injured veterans in conjunction with or instead of more traditional therapies whose results are less significant or associated with significant side effects," Dr. Harch - President of the IHMF said.

Paul G. Harch, M.D.
President
The International Hyperbaric Medical Foundation
http://www.hyperbaricmedicalfoundation.org
Sponsor, National Brain Injury Rescue and Rehabilitation Trial (N-BIRR)
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