PCC Issue Brief Addresses Concerns about Recently Approved SEDASYS Device for Colonoscopy Screening

Preventing Colorectal Cancer's sixth issue brief examines the pros and cons of the SEDASYS device, which replaces anesthesiologists and certified nurse anesthetists in the surgical suite.

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Issue Brief #6 addresses lingering concerns regarding the safety of the SEDASYS device when used for colonoscopy screening.

Annapolis, MD (PRWEB) October 16, 2013

Preventing Colorectal Cancer (PCC) has released the sixth issue brief in a series that underscores the importance of increasing U.S. colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates, and highlights the obstacles and opportunities that influence efforts to achieve this goal. Issue Brief #6, FDA Approves SEDASYS Device: Patient Education Critical to Understanding Sedation Device Limitations, addresses lingering concerns regarding the safety of the SEDASYS device when used for colonoscopy screening.

The new brief examines the pros and cons of the device, which replaces anesthesiologists and certified nurse anesthetists (CRNA) in the surgical suite. The report also features valuable guidance for consumers, including safety parameters and questions patients should ask before consenting to the use of this machine during a procedure.

PCC launched the Issue Brief series to educate key stakeholders on the importance of increasing screening rates among the U.S. population. The series is a compelling resource for physicians, patients, payors, public policy experts, and others who can take action to make a difference and serve as champions for patient safety.

“Many health organizations, including Preventing Colorectal Cancer, have raised concerns about the efficacy of SEDASYS based on flaws in the way the device operates,” says Stanford R. Plavin, MD, PCC board vice chair and president, Ambulatory Anesthesia of Atlanta. “How this pertains to colonoscopy screening presents opportunities and challenges for all parties involved.”

Previous Issue Briefs in the series can be found here. Topics include:

  •     Colonoscopies Prevent Colon Cancer
  •     Preventing Colorectal Cancer: The Benefit of Propofol
  •     Health Insurers Should Cover Propofol Sedation
  •     Why We Need Pricing Transparency
  •     The Impact of Health Insurance Reform on Colorectal Cancer

“Only recently have most insurance providers agreed to pay for propofol sedation,” Dr. Plavin says. “Use of the SEDASYS device has created a new roadblock in the payment arena – continued monitoring of this situation is vital.”

PCC hopes the Issue Brief series will save lives by providing the information and guidance needed to educate the public, policymakers and other key stakeholders regarding colorectal cancer screening coverage, including safe sedation options.

“Innovations are part of the normal path of progress in any field,” says Steven J. Morris, MD, FACP, PCC board chair and president, Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates. “Preventing Colorectal Cancer is committed to promoting colorectal cancer screening as a preventive measure in the safest possible circumstances. When products such as the SEDASYS device come to market, it is PCC’s mission to voice concerns and initiatives that advocate for patient safety.”

Those interested may visit http://www.preventingcolorectalcancer.org to sign up to receive the issue briefs as they become available via email. The website also contains other valuable resources and information on CRC and prevention efforts.

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About Preventing Colorectal Cancer (http://www.preventingcolorectalcancer.org)
Headquartered in Annapolis, MD, Preventing Colorectal Cancer (PCC) preserves the tradition of safe, comfortable and quality-based medicine. PCC is a not-for-profit 501(c) 6 advocacy organization with the primary mission to educate both public and private stakeholders about the opportunities to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer through promoting effective screening, prevention and care options for patients. Membership is open to all individuals and groups.


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