This Man Changed History - New Book by James T Tagues

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James T. Tague changed history; he was in Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963, and was wounded by a stray bullet. His testimony forced the Warren Commission to come up with the “magic bullet.”

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I was then called to testify before the Warren Commission on July 23, 1964.I testified, the Warren Report was rewritten and history was changed.

This man changed history - New book by James T. Tague

James T. Tague changed history. He was in Dealey Plaza on November 22, 1963, and was wounded by a stray bullet. His testimony forced the Warren Commission to come up with the “magic bullet.”

Tague’s book, LBJ and the Kennedy Killing is being official released today, October 22, 2013, one month before the 50th anniversary of that fateful day.

The book consists of 101 short chapters that tell an incredible story.

Mr. Tague is available for interviews; please contact Kris Millegan at publisher(at)trineday(dot)net.

Here is a sample chapter:

Jim Lehrer

On June 5, 1964, I had heard on television and read in the newspapers that the Warren Commission was through with their investigation, that three shots had been fired hitting Kennedy, Connally, Kennedy in that order and Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone nut assassin.

I had not been called to testify before the Warren Commission and there was no mention of the missed shot. By accident I came into contact with a young Dallas Times Herald reporter that very morning. His name was Jim Lehrer, he came to my place of business. Before I told Jim Lehrer about the missed shot and my minor injury during the assassination, I asked Mr. Lehrer not to use my name. He agreed.

It had been over six months since the assassination of President Kennedy and there had been almost no mention in the media, newspaper or television, of a missed shot or my minor injury. By now if I told someone I had been there in Dealey Plaza when the assassination occurred, and that a bullet had hit the street in front of me throwing debris into my face during the shooting, they would look at me like I was the biggest liar in the world, and turn and walk away shaking their heads.

I told Jim Lehrer how I happened to be in Dealey Plaza by accident, getting stopped by traffic and then the gunshots. It was about 9:30 in the morning on June 5, 1964 when I met Mr. Lehrer. I had just returned from the Indianapolis 500-mile race and had some spectacular film developed the day before that I had taken at the race of the crash that killed Eddie Sachs and Steve McDonald.

I brought my 8mm movie projector to work to show my work buddies the film I had taken of the Indy crash and also the Dealey Plaza film I had taken in early May to show my parents, when I went to the Indy 500.

After the interview about my being in Dealey Plaza, the missed shot, and my minor injury during the Kennedy assassination, I showed Mr. Lehrer the Dealey Plaza film and then I showed the Indy crash. I remember asking Lehrer if there was any value to the Indy film and he told me no, a week had passed and it was now old news.

About an hour after Lehrer left my office, around 11 a.m., he called me all excited. The Dallas Times Herald was an evening newspaper and it had not come out yet, but he had put my story on the wire services. He stated he was getting calls “from all over,” including the Warren Commission, wanting to know who I was, and he had to tell them. He assured me he was not using my name in the story in the local paper. It was years before I was able to put the whole story together and realize what Jim Lehrer’s interview had triggered.

One thing I found out was that the FBI was at Lehrer’s Dallas Times Herald office at 4:30 that afternoon and their FBI report was not kind to me. I have a copy of that FBI report of their meeting with Lehrer that afternoon of June 5, 1964.

One of the things in that FBI report that aggravated me was that my asking Mr. Lehrer if the film about the Indy crash I had showed him had any value was now in the FBI report saying I was trying to make money off of the assassination of President Kennedy. There were other non-flattering things in the Lehrer-FBI report. People in the know have told me that is the way the FBI writes their reports when they want to discredit you.

The attempt to discredit me by the FBI was short-lived when two United State Assistant Attorney Generals assigned to the Dallas U. S. Attorney General’s office stepped forward with evidence of the missed shot and sent the evidence to J. Lee Rankin, Chief Counsel for the Warren Commission. I was then called to testify before the Warren Commission on July 23, 1964.

I testified, the Warren Report was rewritten and history was changed.

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Kris Millegan
TrineDay Books
+1 (800) 556-2012
Email >

Kris Millegan
TrineDay
800 556-2012
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