As Halloween Nears a Novelist States "Wiccans Look Like Everybody Else"

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As Halloween approaches on the 31st of October, Richard Wanderer author of the fictional suspense novel, "The Holiday Party (A Tale of a Corporate Takeover)" is reminded he researched witchcraft and the Wicca religion when he wrote his noveland concluded movies and TV shows, though entertaining, have often been far different from reality when it comes to the practice of Wicca and witchcraft and the way these people really look and act.

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Richard Wanderer, author of "The Holiday Party (A Tale of a Corporate Takeover)" http://www.theholidayparty-ataleofacorporatetakeover.com states, "To add some extra excitement to my fictional suspense novel, I spent considerable time researching witchcraft and the Wicca religion. I learned witchcraft has been around for many centuries and has nothing to do with satanic worship and people being strange just because they practice it. It is a naturalist religion - even people dancing around bonfires, centuries ago, on broomsticks were related to an agrarian celebration of growing crops."

Wanderer goes on to say "As a result of my research for my novel, I take the readers through a Manhattan coven meeting where the members look nothing like the classic Halloween witches. They go to regular jobs every day and look like everybody else.

Unlike TV shows like 'American Horror Story: Coven', though they are certainly well written, entertaining and well acted, can influence how the general public thinks about witchcraft. A recent article in the Los Angeles Times reveals the popularity of this type of show."

In "The Holiday Party (A Tale of a Corporate Takeover)", Wanderer's novel, a huge, for profit only, media conglomerate takes over a family owned national magazine which was run in an employee friendly manner. One of the employees of the magazine belonged to the Manhattan coven. Then the conglomerate comes and institutes a Draconian thrift regime and fires loyal employees of the takeover magazine for little or no cause (mostly because in the eyes of the takeover conglomerate they made too much money). Their former friendly immediate management is soon gone. A new management takes over that in many ways is worse than TV and movies about witchcraft - they really hurt people's lives. The employees are now economic victims with families to support. Their efforts had made the magazine a profitable enterprise and ironically a great takeover target.

Richard Wanderer's background for writing his fictional suspense novel about the takeover of a national magazine and what happens to the lives of its employees after the takeover is that he spent more than 50 years of his life working in the advertising sales departments of major national magazines and newspaper chains in NYC and LA. His characters and scenarios are often an amalgamation of people and situations he has come into contact with through his personal experiences as well as a writer's imagination. Later in life, while working full time and raising a family, he also became a member of the California Bar.

Website for recent article about "American Horror Story: Coven"
http:http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-jessica-lange-coven-20131022,0,5903796.story#axzz2iZQqU0wt

About Richard Wanderer's novel, "The Holiday Party (A Tale of a Corporate Takeover)" http://www.theholidayparty-ataleofacorporatetakeover.com Wanderer tells his story from the viewpoint of the loyal employees who helped build the magazine into a prominent success story only to see strangers take it over. It has received many strong reviews: Kirkus Reviews calls it, "A sharply observed saga of workplace tyranny"; San Francisco Book Review, "Page-turner"; MidwestBook Review, "Highly recommended";

IndieReader, "Suspenseful"; Bookviews by Alan Caruba, "Leaps off its pages"; Cynthia Brian of World Talk Radio, "This book is so well written and is frightening in its accuracy and its realism and ferocity." Published by Two Harbors Press, the novel is in softcover and also available on Kindle and Nook.

Contact: Patricia O'Brien, St. Bernard Public Relations (818) 986-7777

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