American Water Resources Association Journal Looks at 30 Years of Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay

From water quality standards to establishing allocations, 10 papers tell the story of the Chesapeake Bay restoration.

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Chesapeake Bay Bridge

Bay Bridge at Sunset, by Steve Droter. Image courtesy of the Chesapeake Bay Program.

In effect, the Featured Collection serves as a gateway and introduction to a treasure trove of information on Chesapeake Bay, much of which is not found in peer-reviewed journals

MIddleburg, VA (PRWEB) October 28, 2013

The Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) is pleased to present in its October 2013 issue a Featured Collection, "Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Development and Application." Ten papers plus an introduction tell the story of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL from developing water quality standards through to establishing allocations — an up-to-date picture of the result of 30 years of restoration effort.

The Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a unique regional partnership that has led and directed the restoration of Chesapeake Bay since 1983, has coordinated a huge scientific effort to learn more about this irreplaceable natural resource. CPB is comprised of federal and state agencies, local governments, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions. Guest Associate Editors Lewis Linker, Richard Batiuk, and Carl Cerco put together this Featured Collection to document the effort to establish nutrient and sediment TMDLs for the Bay and its surrounding watershed. A very large part of the research and data collection for Chesapeake Bay was done under cooperative agreements with states and universities, interagency agreements with federal agencies, and contracts. The resulting reports reside in CPB’s Bay Resource Library. The papers in the Featured Collection draw upon this and other resources to describe the various elements for determining TMDLs: the data collection, the comprehensive models -- atmospheric deposition, watershed, hydrodynamic and water quality -- and the public involvement. In effect, the Featured Collection serves as a gateway and introduction to a treasure trove of information on Chesapeake Bay, much of which is not found in peer-reviewed journals.

The 2010 Chesapeake Bay TMDL sets watershed-wide limits of 84.3 million kilograms of nitrogen, 5.67 million kilograms of phosphorus, and 2.93 billion kilograms of sediment per year. Implementation of the nutrient and sediment limits is through the seven watershed jurisdictions’ Watershed Implementation Plans, which detail how and when the six Bay watershed states and the District of Columbia will meet their assigned pollution allocations.

The Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA) is published bimonthly by the American Water Resources Association, Middleburg, Virginia, in partnership with Wiley-Blackwell.

More information:
AWRA: http://www.awra.org
JAWRA: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1752-1688
Chesapeake Bay program: http://www.chesapeakebay.net/
Bay Program Library: http://www.chesapeakebay.net/library.


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